News

Dulac, Louisiana, is a 30-minute drive from the nearest grocery store, making it difficult on families who struggle with food security.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

More than half of Louisiana’s public school children get free or reduced-priced meals at school because their families are struggling financially. But when school lets out for the summer, kids still need to eat. And that’s tough on poor families, especially in rural areas. 

UNITED SOYBEAN BOARD / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Louisiana plants more soybean per acre than any other row crop in the state. Last month, China introduced a tariff on American soybeans, making them 25% more expensive for Chinese buyers. The move was a response to tariffs announced by President Trump on Chinese goods. How will the soybean tariff impact Louisiana farmers? 

Nancy Rabalais / Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium

Every summer, a dead zone forms in the Gulf of Mexico. It’s an area with so little oxygen that marine life can’t survive, caused mostly by agricultural fertilizers that wash down the Mississippi River.

 

According to a new study from the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), it’s much smaller this year. But, that might not necessarily be a sign of progress.

Inside The Arts: Newsies: The Musical, Satchmo Summerfest, White Linen Night

This week on Inside the Arts, read all about it! Newsies is coming to New Orleans. Summer Lyric Theatre of Tulane presents the stage musical based on the Disney hit movie.

Then, Satchmo Summerfest presented by Chevron gets underway in the French Quarter. The 18th annual celebration honors legendary trumpeter and native son Louis Armstrong.

And... Hancock Whitney White Linen Night kicks off an evening of festivities in the Arts District.

  • “The World that Made New Orleans: From Spanish Silver to Congo Square,” by Ned Sublette
  • “Jazzmen,” edited by Frederic Ramsay, with key chapters by William Russell 
  • “New Orleans Jazz: A Family Album,” by Al Rose and Edmond Souchon    
  • “The History of Jazz ,” by Ted Gioia
  • “Louis Armstrong's New Orleans,” by Thomas Brothers
  • “Preservation Hall,” by William Carter
  • “New Orleans Style by Bill Russell,” compiled and Edited by Barry Martyn & Mike Hazeldine
  • “Subversive Sounds: Race and the Birth of Jazz in New Orleans,” by Charles Hersch

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with Amy Bonnaffons, whose marvelous debut story collection is “The Wrong Heaven.” Imagine getting a personal phone call from Barack Obama -- what would you ask him? We’ll also hear from Gillian Rodger, author of “Just One of the Boys: Female-to-Male Cross-Dressing on the American Variety Stage.” New Orleans was a big stop on the variety circuit -- remember the Mardi Gras tale of chanteuse Lydia Thompson.

Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week:

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show with Harry Shearer: The Appresidentice: Pivoting from Helsinki, News of the Olympic Movement, News of the Atom, News of the WarmNews of the Godly, The Apologies of the Week, and more!

Musical instruments produce their sound in many ways, plucking, bowing, blowing, beating, etc. This Continuum program is devoted to two instruments: one that's plucked (the harpsichord), and one that's bowed (the cello). Harpsichord music by Francois Couperin (1668-1733) is performed by New Orleans-born Skip Sempe, whose first keyboard teacher was Milton Scheuermann, and solo suites for cello by Bach are performed by Tess Remy-Schumacher.

"Peas on a Plate" by Sandy Skoglund currently on display in the Louisiana Art & Science Museum's "Feast for the Eyes" exhibit.
Sandy Skoglund, Peas on a Plate, 1978. © 1978 Sandy Skoglund / Courtesy RYAN LEE Gallery, New York

This week’s show is, in a word, sensational. Join us as we delve into the many ways that our other four senses experience food.

We begin in Baton Rouge at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum. Their food photography exhibit, Feast for the Eyes, runs the gamut from still lifes to the avant-garde. And it’s on view at LASM through September 16.

Enrico Strocchi / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: sharks, the evironmental impact of feral cats, and a new study links temperature and suicide.

WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with Joan Meiners from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune about the week in coastal news.

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