Jess Clark

Education Desk Reporter

Jess Clark is WWNO's Education Desk reporter. Jess comes to the station after two years as Fletcher Fellow for Education Policy Reporting for North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC (Chapel Hill). Her reporting has aired on national programs, including NPR's All Things ConsideredHere & Now from WBURand NPR's Weekend Edition

Originally from Louisville, Kentucky, Jess graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2015 with a master's in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Ways to Connect

Jessica Rosgaard

Road conditions are improving as southeast Louisiana continues to thaw from a deep freeze. But problems with the water system have school districts closed and city officials warning residents to be prepared for a few more difficult days ahead.

Teachers at Kids of Excellence second location on Higgins Drive start the morning off with songs in circle time.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

In part one of WWNO's series on early child care and education in Louisiana, we heard about how costs are keeping many families from accessing quality early childhood education. But costs are also having an impact on child care centers themselves.  In part two, we look at whether children are getting quality instruction when families can afford to send them to licensed centers.

Shawanda Jefferson picks up her four-year-old son at the unregulated child care center — her only option due to costs.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Most kids enter the public school system at age five. But scientists say that, actually, it’s the first four years of a child’s life that are the most important for learning and brain development. High-quality early child care and education can set a child up for success in life. But can Louisiana families get access to it? And are child care facilities providing it? We investigate in a two-part series. Part One: How cost is a barrier for families seeking early childhood education.

 

Listen to Part Two here, on whether New Orleans toddlers are getting quality instruction when they're families can afford to send them to licensed centers.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu signed budget ammendments Monday that allocate $750,000 to pre-K.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu signed a 2018 city budget amendment Monday that appropriates $750,000 for pre-K for low-income children in New Orleans.

Supporters of the leadership at Bethune and Baby Ben cheer for a student who urged the OPSB to grant Bethune's current leadership a charter.
Jess Clark / WWNO

Superintendent Henderson Lewis says Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary and Benjamin Franklin Elementary are ready to become charter schools. Lewis' approval of the schools' plans mean next year, there will likely remain just one traditional public school in the district.

Freezing temperatures and possible light snow are prompting schools to close Friday in several parishes.
tookapic / Pixbay Creative Commons

Possible wintry weather is prompting several New Orleans-area schools to close Friday.

Einstein Charter Schools says it doesn't believe they should have to provide transportation for students. Instead it directs parents to private van services.
Jess Clark / WWNO

The Orleans Parish School Board is taking Einstein Charter Schools to court over the school group's transportation policy. The board filed a petition in Orleans Parish Civil District Court Wednesday, asking the court to declare Einstein in breach of its charter contract and allow OPSB to force Einstein to bus students.

A new report shows per-student spending is down in a majority of the states, including Louisiana.
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

Louisiana is among 29 states spending less on students than before the Great Recession, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

A new state report showing how well students are progressing shows less than half of Louisiana students are on track to master important skills and knowledge.
DCJOHN / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Researchers at the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans have released a new report showing Louisiana's black students and low-income students are more likely to be suspended than white and wealthier students. 

Supporters of the leadership at Bethune and Baby Ben cheer for a student who urged the OPSB to grant Bethune's current leadership a charter.
Jess Clark / WWNO

It's the general understanding that Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary and Benjamin Franklin Elementary and Middle will become charter schools. The only question is when that will happen, and who will run them. The schools' current principals think it should be them, so they applied to the Orleans Parish School Board to convert them into charters beginning next year. But an independent report recommended the board deny their applications.

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