Tegan Wendland

Interim News Director, Lead Coastal Reporter

As interim news director Tegan has overseen the work of reporters and announcers, and has coordinated with counterparts at WRKF in Baton Rouge and other collaborating news organizations.

Tegan came to WWNO in 2015 to report coastal news. In this role she has covered a wide range of issues and subjects related to coastal land loss, coastal restoration, and the culture and economy of Louisiana’s coastal zone. Prominent recent projects include New Orleans: Ready Or Not?, a five-part series examining the city’s readiness for a future dominated by a changing climate, and Flyover: Down the Mississippi, a special production of Minnesota Public Radio in which she served as lead local producer for episodes focused on coastal land loss and the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

In 2017, Tegan was one of ten reporters from around the world to receive a Metcalf Fellowship for Marine and Environmental reporting, and she also received a competitive resilience reporting fellowship at CUNY in New York City. In 2016 she was named the Louisiana Wildlife Federation’s Conservation Communicator of the Year, and she secured funding to travel to Paris to report on the international climate talks there in 2015.

Tegan has a master’s degree in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has previously worked for NPR stations in the Midwest and WRKF in Baton Rouge.

Ways to Connect

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Raising kids is hard work. The St. Tammany Parish Parenting Center in Covington helps parents from all backgrounds face those challenges and take pride in the role they play in their children’s lives, and it’s also a place to socialize and find camaraderie.

On a recent weekday evening toys were scattered across the carpet and children played while parents filed in after work to support each other and learn how to be the best parents they can be.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Churches of several denominations are coming together to address an often invisible problem on the Northshore: family homelessness.

Nineteen churches decided to pool their resources and host homeless families in need. They take turns hosting the families at each church and rotate every week, providing food, childcare, counseling services and transportation, to help the family get back on their feet.

Well, technically it’s 13 for now, there’s a baby on the way.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Thrifty shoppers often seek hidden treasures and surprises at thrift stores. But visitors at one store outside New Orleans can also help stray animals.

The St. Francis Animal Sanctuary thrift store offers a unique gathering place for the Mandeville community — a room full of happy cats.
 

Sometimes customers are surprised when they notice one corner of the St. Francis Animal Sanctuary thrift store is screened off. It holds about 20 cats, who lounge around and play with one another while volunteers sit in recliners and pet them.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Every week in Old Mandeville, the gray stucco train depot comes alive for the Mandeville Trailhead Community Market. Sponsored by the city, it saw about 24,000 visitors last year and hosts about 60 vendors every Saturday.

The market is a place to buy local crafts, soap, honey, baked goods and plants. Plus, it provides many with companionship and community.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

It’s not easy finding a job, especially one you really love. It can be even harder for those with physical and mental disabilities.

An organization in St. Tammany Parish aims to help people gain independence through work.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Stray animals are a big problem all over Louisiana, including on the Northshore. Once a year the St. Tammany Parish Humane Society organizes with other local shelters to provide a huge low-cost vaccination clinic and adoption event called Woofstock.

Go here for more information on the 2016 event - www.sthumane.org 

Norman Billiot of Lacombe stood in a long line that stretched far down the block outside a big building at Pelican Park in Mandeville.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

An organization in Covington is doing what it can to help families of children with disabilities.

Northshore Families Helping Families is a family-driven resource center that provides information and referrals for families along the Northshore. One of their key events is called “Touch a Truck.” It’s a fundraiser for the organization, but also an opportunity for kids to interact with law enforcement and have fun.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Preservationists and music lovers in Mandeville are working to create a new seasonal tradition — enjoying jazz music in an open-air, historic jazz hall. Cars lined a back street in a Mandeville neighborhood on a recent Friday, as soft Christmas lights and the sound of jazz lit up the warm autumn air.

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