Travis Lux

Coastal Reporter

As Coastal Reporter, Travis Lux covers flood protection, coastal restoration, infrastructure, the energy and seafood industries, and the environment. In this role he's reported on everything from pipeline protests in the Atchafalaya swamp, to how shrimpers cope with low prices. He had a big hand in producing the series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?, which examined how prepared New Orleans is for a future with more extreme weather. In 2017, Travis co-produced two episodes of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 examining New Orleans' historic efforts at flood protection. One episode, NOLA vs Nature: The Other Biggest Flood in New Orleans History, was recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors and the New Orleans Press Club. His stories often find a wider audience on national programs, too, like NPR's Morning Edition, WBUR's Here and Now, and WHYY's The Pulse.

Before joining WWNO, Travis reported for Marfa Public Radio in Far West Texas, and for WRKF in Baton Rouge. He studied Anthropology and Sociology at Rhodes College and radio production at the Transom Story Workshop.

Ways to Connect

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

The goal of the 2016 Paris Climate agreement is to limit global warming to less than two degrees celsius above pre-industrial levels. While President Trump has announced his intentions to pull out of the agreement, other nations, cities, and researchers are still working toward that goal.

This week, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report showing what will happen if the earth warms more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels (we’re already at about 1°C). The outlook is dire.

For this week’s coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with one of the report’s authors, Bill Solecki, professor of Geography at Hunter College in New York.

CPRA

On Wednesday, congress passed America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018, which could encourage the Army Corps of Engineers to build more green infrastructure.

Infrastructure bills are fairly routine. Generally passed every couple years, they often approve lists of projects for things like river dredging or levees -- projects that the Corps builds.

New this year: a section that requires the Corps to consider “natural or nature-based” projects as alternatives if it wants to build something.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board has been been in turmoil since major flooding across the city last summer. After several changes in leadership, the utility finally has a new, permanant executive director: Ghassan Korban.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, Korban sits down with WWNO's Travis Lux to talk about his priorities and longer-term vision.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Louisiana shrimpers are facing low prices. They say the business is tougher than it’s ever been, and recently considered striking. Many are looking for creative ways to make more money.

 

After a high-profile campaign to oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline in 2016, a number of states moved to make it harder to protest oil and gas projects. Now in Louisiana, the first felony arrests of protesters could be a test case of these tougher laws as opponents vow a legal challenge.

Travis Lux / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: construction on part of the controversial Bayou Bridge pipeline has been halted and several protesters face felonies. Plus, shrimpers are catching record low amounts of shrimp in the Gulf.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks about the week in coastal news with Tristan Baurick, from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: the Endangered Species Act. The ESA went into effect in 1973, and since then, several Louisiana species that were once endangered have come back from the brink of extinction.

 

Recently, both congress and the Trump Administration have proposed changes to the law.

 

Sara Sneath, environmental reporter for Nola.com/The Times-Picayune, has been writing about the impact of the law in Louisiana. WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with her about the proposed changes, and how the act has helped some of Louisiana’s most iconic species -- like the American alligator, the brown pelican, and the Louisiana black bear.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Just ahead of the 13th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, a museum dedicated to educating people about the storm -- and the levee breaches -- has opened in Gentilly.

The Flooded House Museum is located at 4918 Warrington Dr. in Gentilly. It was severely damaged when the London Avenue Canal levee, which runs directly behind it, failed during the storm.

 

It’s been redone to look like it did the day before the levees broke and flooded the city. Visitors can peer in through the windows, like you would a dollhouse or diorama.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans is getting yet another interim director, and three top officials have resigned from the utility.

The moves come just a couple of weeks before a new permanent director is scheduled to take the helm.

David Callahan -- a retired rear admiral with the Coast Guard -- will be the fourth temporary executive director of the Sewerage and Water Board in about a year. Callahan will replace Jade Brown-Russell.

Brett Duke / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: a newish technology called environmental DNA, how sea level rise threatens internet infrastructure, and what we can learn from the alligator amid proposed changes to the Endangered Species Act.

Environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Joan Meiners from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune talk about the week in coastal news.

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