Travis Lux

Coastal Reporter

As Coastal Reporter, Travis Lux covers flood protection, coastal restoration, infrastructure, the energy and seafood industries, and the environment. In this role he's reported on everything from pipeline protests in the Atchafalaya swamp, to how shrimpers cope with low prices. He had a big hand in producing the series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?, which examined how prepared New Orleans is for a future with more extreme weather. In 2017, Travis co-produced two episodes of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 examining New Orleans' historic efforts at flood protection. One episode, NOLA vs Nature: The Other Biggest Flood in New Orleans History, was recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors and the New Orleans Press Club. His stories often find a wider audience on national programs, too, like NPR's Morning Edition, WBUR's Here and Now, and WHYY's The Pulse.

Before joining WWNO, Travis reported for Marfa Public Radio in Far West Texas, and for WRKF in Baton Rouge. He studied Anthropology and Sociology at Rhodes College and radio production at the Transom Story Workshop.

Ways to Connect

Chris Granger / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roudup: the blessing of the fleet.

Listening Coast

This week on the Coastal New Roundup: how the state of Louisiana sometimes benefits from coastal erosion. Plus, an update on the fight over sediment diversions in Plaquemines Parish.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Major floods last summer thrust infrastructure and drainage issues into the limelight. And new Mayor LaToya Cantrell has made them a top priority for her administration. She has championed the approach to water management outlined in the city's Urban Water Plan — which emphasizes “green infrastructure” solutions like soaking up rain water instead of pumping it out. But that plan is largely unfunded.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans says it’s ready for hurricane season. It has fixed many of its broken pumps and power generators, and is taking steps to monitor summer rain storms more closely.

Travis Lux / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, the state gets more money to figure out how to stop the invasive bug killing the coastal marsh. Plus, two state legislators get into bar fight over coastal restoration.

 

Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune breaks down the week in coastal news with WWNO’s Travis Lux.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Hurricane season is just around the corner. New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell says the city is ready, but now it's time for residents to ready themselves.

"With two weeks to go before June 1, I'm urging our citizens to take action and take their response very, very seriously," Cantrell said.

Over the past century, Louisiana has lost more than 2,000 square miles of coastline, leaving it more vulnerable to storms, flooding and sea level rise. State officials have been fighting back, building levees, artificial marshes and barrier islands. Now they want to harness the muddy Mississippi River, diverting its sediment-rich waters into shrinking marshes and wetlands.

CPRA

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: Plaquemines Parish President Amos Cormier plans to slow down a major coastal restoration project. Plus, air quality alerts and termites invade.

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

In March, the New Orleans city council voted to approve a new gas-fired power plant for Entergy in New Orleans East. It was a controversial decision that came after heated public meetings. People showed up with signs to protest the plant, and others showed up to support it.

Coastal News Roundup: Bayou Bridge Pipeline Update

May 4, 2018
Travis Lux / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: an update on the controversial Bayou Bridge pipeline, plus some of the big picture questions it raises about coastal restoration strategies.

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