Coastal Desk

Southeast Louisiana is sinking under the waves faster than any coastal landscape in the world. With so much at stake for Louisiana and the nation, WWNO has made coastal news a priority.

Since mid-2014 our Coastal Desk reporting team has been producing frequent news reports and in-depth features covering coastal erosion and restoration; hurricane protection; offshore energy and other coastal businesses; wildlife and fisheries impacts; and coastal communities and culture.

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, and local listeners.

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Will Brown

According to a new report, more than 40,000 Louisiana homes and 99,00 Louisiana residents are at risk of chronic flooding due to rising seas in the next 30 years. In total, 311,000 homes may be at risk across the United States.

 

The report was published by the Union of Concerned Scientists, a climate change advocacy group. Researchers made the calculation by combining sea level rise predictions with data from Zillow, an online real estate company.

Chris Granger / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roudup: the blessing of the fleet.

Listening Coast

This week on the Coastal New Roundup: how the state of Louisiana sometimes benefits from coastal erosion. Plus, an update on the fight over sediment diversions in Plaquemines Parish.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Major floods last summer thrust infrastructure and drainage issues into the limelight. And new Mayor LaToya Cantrell has made them a top priority for her administration. She has championed the approach to water management outlined in the city's Urban Water Plan — which emphasizes “green infrastructure” solutions like soaking up rain water instead of pumping it out. But that plan is largely unfunded.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans says it’s ready for hurricane season. It has fixed many of its broken pumps and power generators, and is taking steps to monitor summer rain storms more closely.

NOAA / noaa.gov

June first is the official start of hurricane season. It got started early with subtropical storm Alberto last weekend — forecasters say it’s likely to be an active or above-average season.

Army Corps of Engineers

Ahead of the official start of hurricane season nola.com/The Times-Picayune has released a series on the hurricane protection system built around the city. WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with reporter Mark Schleifstein about what he found.

Travis Lux / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, the state gets more money to figure out how to stop the invasive bug killing the coastal marsh. Plus, two state legislators get into bar fight over coastal restoration.

 

Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune breaks down the week in coastal news with WWNO’s Travis Lux.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Hurricane season is just around the corner. New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell says the city is ready, but now it's time for residents to ready themselves.

"With two weeks to go before June 1, I'm urging our citizens to take action and take their response very, very seriously," Cantrell said.

CPRA

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: Plaquemines Parish President Amos Cormier plans to slow down a major coastal restoration project. Plus, air quality alerts and termites invade.

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