Education Desk

Education news is a priority for WWNO's expanding local news reporting — providing trusted news for parents, educators and community leaders. 

Support for education reporting on WWNO comes from Entergy Corporation.

Ways to Connect

Sixteen-year-old Akelah Sherman (center) and her fellow dancers warm up before rehearsing for their performance.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

For many, the teenage years are a time when you start to realize the world isn’t fair, and life can be tough. Facing issues like income inequality, racism, and violence, can be overwhelming. One unique program in New Orleans is helping students engage with tough social issues through dance.

This story has been updated.

The board of New Orleans charter school Crescent Leadership Academy is turning in its charter, effectively shutting down in the middle of the school year, according to a letter from Orleans Parish School Board superintendent Henderson Lewis.

OPSB Superintendent Henderson Lewis touted a smooth unification process, but seemed to be bracing for a drop in test scores.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

The Orleans Parish School Board is touting a smooth transition to a new unified school district, but also seems to be bracing for new challenges as the state moves to a tougher school grading system.

 

Tulane Makes Learning About Race An Undergraduate Requirement
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

College campuses are more diverse than ever. But many students of color who attend historically white colleges and universities say their schools have a lot of catching up to do to make them feel welcome. Not just on campus, but in the curriculum. Tulane University has become one of the first historically white major research institutions to make learning about race a requirement.  

School founder Vera Triplett holds a potential future student while chatting with current students Joelia Simmons and Langston Kali.
Sharon Lurye / The Hechinger Report

This story about special education was produced by our partners The Lens and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. 

A new state report showing how well students are progressing shows less than half of Louisiana students are on track to master important skills and knowledge.
DCJOHN / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Less than half of Louisiana students are on track to master important math, reading and writing skills, according to a new report from the Louisiana Department of Education.  

Half of Lafayette Academy students will attend school this year at the old McDonogh 35 building on Kelerec Street.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Students from Lafayette Academy Charter School finally returned to the classroom Monday, after a botched asbestos cleanup job created a mess at their school this summer. But some parents aren’t happy with the temporary accommodations at the old McDonogh 35 building. 

Cheundra Bailey is struggling to find a way to pay for her daughter's high school uniform.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

In New Orleans, many families are living paycheck to paycheck. So when the start of the school year comes around, the added cost of returning to the classroom can be a major burden. 

Dulac, Louisiana, is a 30-minute drive from the nearest grocery store, making it difficult on families who struggle with food security.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

More than half of Louisiana’s public school children get free or reduced-priced meals at school because their families are struggling financially. But when school lets out for the summer, kids still need to eat. And that’s tough on poor families, especially in rural areas. 

Lafayette Academy parents attended a meeting with school officials to get answers about asbestos removal jobs that took place at the school.
Jess Clark / WWNO

Parents at New Orleans charter school Lafayette Academy have lots of questions after an investigation by WWNO revealed issues with asbestos removal at the school in 2017. School officials maintain no children were endangered.

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