Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.

 

Subscribe to Where Y'Eat as a podcast:

1. Open Itunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: itpc://wwno.org/podcasts/6095/rss.xml

And that’s it! New episodes download automatically.

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Red beans and rice at Dunbar's Creole Cuisine in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Gumbo is famous. Po-boys get plenty of press and king cake is now a seasonal sensation, splayed across social media for all the hungry world to crave.

The Lenten fish fry is a sign of the season in south Louisiana that brings more than flavor to the table.
Ian McNulty

Sometimes, the food seasons of New Orleans arrive in all the gaudy glory of a king cake, and sometimes they register as the roiling boil of crawfish revving up in the backyard.

A specially cultivated oyster from the waters around Grand Isle.
Ian McNulty

If we're at an oyster bar in Louisiana, we are usually not after something new, unless maybe it’s some different mojo in the cocktail sauce. But the oyster? We already know exactly what to expect. It will be a Gulf oyster – big, gregarious, generous, delicious, a bargain too and a taste we know by heart.

Arthur "Mr. Okra" Robinson was a beloved produce vendor in New Orleans. He died Feb. 15, 2018 at age 74.
Ian McNulty

When Mr. Okra died last week, it seemed to mark the end of an era. His real name was Arthur Robinson, and for decades he was a roving produce vendor, singing the praises of his inventory through the city streets. It felt like a last living link to an old tradition in New Orleans.

Crawfish is more than a meal in Louisiana. It's a way of life.
Ian McNulty

No matter what else you put into your crawfish boil, one crucial ingredient is patience. That’s what enforces the proper timing for soaking, boiling and resting the mudbugs, even when everyone is ready to eat, clutching their koozies and staring at the pot.

Even some gas stations in New Orleans get into the Mardi Gras spirit, especially those that double as fried chicken outlets.
Ian McNulty

Somewhere near the entrance to a Magnolia Discount gas station in Gert Town, a whiff from the gas pumps and a waft of just-fried chicken commingled in the air.

King cake doberge at the Bakery Bar in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

The cynical might chalk it up to the sugar buzz talking, but I believe king cake brings optimism. It barrels through indecision in favor of indulgence. It can brighten your day, even if it’s the last thing you eat at night. It’s not just a cake, it’s an emblem.

This is also why king cake has become contentious.

King cake milkshake at Frey Smoked Meat Co. in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

The kid was staring at me, and I didn’t blame him. He was having lunch with his parents at the next table over and he was fixated on the king cake milkshake that I was eating all by myself.

Oysters line the stand-up oyster bar at Mr. Ed's in Metairie.
Ian McNulty

This is an ode to the oyster bar, and not just any oyster bar. Today I raise a toast to the stand-up oyster bar. 

King cake goes black and gold at Hi Do Bakery, a Terrytown bake shop just outside New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

What happens when purple, green and gold morphs with black and gold? New Orleans is now getting a long overdue refresher course on the phenomenon and one of the ways it shows up is king cake.

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