carnival

This week on The Reading Life: Kim Vaz-Deville , editor of "Walking Raddy: The Baby Dolls of New Orleans," a glorious celebration of the women's masking and marching tradition. Vaz-Deville is also the author of "The Baby Dolls: Breaking the Race and Gender Barriers of the New Orleans Mardi Gras Tradition." She is professor of education and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Xavier University of Louisiana. And we'll hear some special audio of producer George Ingmire's interview with Baby Doll Tee-Eva Perry.

The Reading Life celebrates Mardi Gras with Howard Philips Smith, author of the gorgeous new book, Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans, and we’ll hear from Al Kennedy, whose new book is Chief of Chiefs: Robert Nathaniel Lee and the Mardi Gras Indians of New Orleans, 1915-2001.

American Routes Shortcuts: Monk Boudreaux

Feb 9, 2018
Monk Boudreaux
American Routes

Each year Mardi Gras Indians greet the day on the city streets to sing and strut. This has been going on since the late 19th century. The call and response sounds of the Indians often carry the Congo beat, fundamental in New Orleans' musical fabric. The beloved Indian chief Monk Boudreaux has been masking Indian for more than 70 years. We visited him at home where he quietly sewed his new suit.

Kim Welsh

Carnival season in New Orleans kicks off on January 6th with Twelfth Night celebrations across the city - including the 10th ride of the Krewe of Joan of Arc. WWNO's Jessica Rosgaard sat down with the Krewe's president and founder, Amy Kirk Duvoisin, to talk about why the Krewe celebrates the Maid of Orléans, France.

The Krewe of Joan of Arc parade walks through the French Quarter on Saturday night starting at 6pm. A Tricentennial fireworks celebration follows at 9pm along the riverfront.

Ian McNulty

Some of the city's old-guard restaurants hold heralded places in Carnival tradition, and king cakes have been glittering extra brightly lately as chefs and bakers around New Orleans put their own stamp on its form and flavors.   

But, when it comes to keeping people going through the long haul of Carnival, the heavy lifting often falls to much more humble fare from unsung suppliers. These are the grocery stores, the delis and the specialty caterers of New Orleans, businesses that work at fever pitch once the parade season reaches its prime time. 

Duane And Susan Hoff
Reggie Morris

It’s Carnival time in Louisiana! On this week's show, we're talking Mardi Gras traditions with newcomers and locals alike. 

To begin, we learn some surprises about the Krewe of Mid-City, a very local parading organization that is about to be graced by an expected king and queen. Originally from Minnesota, business moguls Duane and Susan Hoff are the owners of Fantesca Estate and Winery in Napa Valley. About to take their thrones, we visit with Duane and Susan to find out how they came to reign over this community-focused krewe.

King cakes have become a popular cultural icon in New Orleans, though some still look for the satisfaction of an old classic style.
Ian McNulty

King cakes have been popular in New Orleans for a long time. But not this popular. Something has changed.

King cake has become a cultural statement, one of those emblems of pride that New Orleans uses to celebrate itself. King cake is the Saints fleur-de-lis of food. You live it, you wear it, you rally around it.

Photo Credit: Shannon Gleespen

This week on Inside the Arts, the greatest free show on earth is well underway... Mardi Gras 2016 is here! 

We'll listen to the sounds of Mardi Gras,check out what's good to eat on the street and check in with artists who are making carnival float art available for public collection. We’ll also scream for beads and dance till we drop. Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Uptown New Orleans is pretty much one big construction site. And a lot of that construction is happening along parade routes. How will the city's major drainage project affect Mardi Gras?

Star-Steppin' Cosmonaughties Headed For Funky Times

Jan 27, 2016
Kelley Crawford

When it comes to Mardi Gras, you can never understate the difference between watching a parade and marching in one. The experience is so alluring that it’s no surprise many krewes get bigger and bigger each year. Take for example, The Star-Steppin’ Cosmonaughties: a dancing krewe now in their fifth year, that’s ready for Carnival season with new moves and big surprises.

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