coastal restoration

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, we take a look at barrier islands — what they do, and why the state is creating them artificially. Plus, we explore what less sediment in the Mississippi River could mean for coastal restoration and the return of a Jean Lafitte tradition: pirogue races.

Travis Lux / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, the state gets more money to figure out how to stop the invasive bug killing the coastal marsh. Plus, two state legislators get into bar fight over coastal restoration.

 

Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune breaks down the week in coastal news with WWNO’s Travis Lux.

Coastal News Roundup: Bayou Bridge Pipeline Update

May 4, 2018
Travis Lux / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: an update on the controversial Bayou Bridge pipeline, plus some of the big picture questions it raises about coastal restoration strategies.

Coastal News Roundup: Oil Spill Edition

Apr 20, 2018
SkyTruth / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

It was eight years ago today that the Deepwater Horizon oil rig blew up, spewing more than 160 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over several months.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) wants feedback on its list of projects for the next year. Officials are holding a series of public meetings. The first meeting was last night in Belle Chasse.

 

The state’s big-picture plan to protect and restore the coast is updated every five years — it includes plans for things like river diversions and rebuilding marshes. That’s the Master Plan. But the money for those projects is approved on a yearly basis — the Annual Plan.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com|The Times-Picayune

Every Friday, coastal reporters from WWNO and Nola.com | The Times-Picayune come together to talk about the week in coastal news.

This week: a platform fire in the Gulf, concern around Sewerage and Water Board contracts and an effort to rebuild the coast from the sky.

Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana

Mayoral candidates Desiree Charbonnet and Latoya Cantrell discussed water issues at a debate Wednesday night.

 

But it wasn’t much of a debate. Turns out, they actually agree on more than they disagree when it comes to water issues.

Travis Lux / WWNO

For decades, oil and gas companies dug canals through Louisiana's marshes looking for oil and building pipelines.

Those canals are one of the big causes of coastal land loss. Now a handful of parishes are suing the oil and gas companies over that damage.

It seems like filling the canals back in with soil would be a good way to fix the damage, but that's not part of the state's new Coastal Master Plan.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The state has a coastal master plan to stave off land loss and each parish has it’s own plans for the coast.

 

In Terrebonne Parish, officials are looking for public buy-in. Earlier this week they invited people to the Houma-Terrebonne Civic Center for Coastal Day -- a science fair of sorts displaying all the coastal projects in their backyard.

 

The Data Center

Louisiana spends hundreds of millions of dollars every year to restore and protect the coastline with big earth-moving projects, like building marshes and barrier islands.

 

The state hires professional contractors to bring in their backhoes, dozers, dredges and workboats to do the job. It’s big business. But a new report says not enough of that money is staying in the state. And with billions of dollars coming from the BP settlement, some see that as a problem.

 

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