culture

Over 85 Local Arts & Nonprofit Organizations

Culture Collision is dedicated to fostering all of the nonprofit performing and visual arts organizations in the New Orleans metro-area. Join us Wednesday, August 29, at our 10th annual event!

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer presents News of the Olympic Movement, News of the Land of 15,000 Princes, Let Us Try, News of Inspectors General, the Apresidentice, Apologies of the Week, along with satirical skits, musical selections from Harry, and more.

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with Victor Harris, Rachel Breunlin, and JeffreyEhrenreich, creators of the beautiful book, “Fire in the Hole: The Spirit Work of Fi-Yi-Yi and the Mandingo Warriors.”

Travis Lux / WWNO

Legendary musician Antoine “Fats” Domino passed away last week. New Orleanians celebrated his life and career with a second line parade Wednesday night. The whole thing started at Vaughan's, a bar in the Bywater. The intersection out front was packed by 5 p.m.

People were selling cold drinks and cotton candy. There were barbecue booths atop portable trailers. One person was wearing Fats Domino fat-suit complete with paper mache head, but most were wearing some shade of blue — a reference to the titles of some of Domino’s most famous songs like Blue Monday and Blueberry Hill.

Tune in Friday October 27 at 1pm  or Wednesday November 1 at 7pm

Once there was a slave uprising so epic, it led Napoleon to sell Louisiana to the United States, and brought thousands of refugees to New Orleans, doubling the city's population in just a few months.  The Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), the only successful slave rebellion in the Americas, had a dramatic and lasting effect on New Orleans and North America.  Today many New Orleanians, black and white, trace their ancestral roots to Haiti.  The Caribbean nation remains an important part of the story New Orleans tell about itself.  But is New Orleans a part of Haitian history?  Is the feeling mutual?  TriPod sent producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson to find out.

Photo: Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago / Collection of Pamela Joyner, © Estate of Norman Lewis, Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY

This week on Inside the Arts, Black artists and history are the focus of a gallery talk in conjunction with the nationally touring exhibit, Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection, opening this week at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. We talk with curator Katy Siegel.

Then, classical concert pianist Justin Snyder explores music for piano and electronics in SYNTHESIS.

And, Jazz historian Bruce Raeburn revisits the Storyville diaspora with a lecture in conjunction with The Historic New Orleans Collection's exhibit, Storyville: Madams and Music. 

Zack Smith

The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival continues its 44th year of music today at the Fair Grounds. This morning a new music education center was dedicated to one of the festival’s founders, George Wein, and his wife Joyce.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Mayhaw

Apr 28, 2012
CCFM

Are you familiar with a traditional food that’s just come into season: Mayhaw. It is so named for May Day, its peak season. According to mayhaw mythology, this wild, apple-like cousin of the hawthorn tree thrives in swampy coastal Louisiana and Texas.

The Oretha Castle Haley Cultural Corridor in Central City comes alive this weekend, as the Ashé Cultural Arts Center kicks off Redd Linen Night.