education

Cheundra Bailey is struggling to find a way to pay for her daughter's high school uniform.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

In New Orleans, many families are living paycheck to paycheck. So when the start of the school year comes around, the added cost of returning to the classroom can be a major burden. 

Dulac, Louisiana, is a 30-minute drive from the nearest grocery store, making it difficult on families who struggle with food security.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

More than half of Louisiana’s public school children get free or reduced-priced meals at school because their families are struggling financially. But when school lets out for the summer, kids still need to eat. And that’s tough on poor families, especially in rural areas. 

Rain clouds gather over Esperanza Charter School in Mid-City. The neighborhood was hard hit during the flooding of August 2017.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Climate change is bringing more intense weather — more rain, heat and storms. And in New Orleans, extreme weather is disruptive. People park their cars up on curbs, and miss work — and school. It turns out kids missed a lot of school this past year, largely because of aging infrastructure failing during extreme weather.

Results from the 2018 state standardized tests show New Orleans-area students are trailing their peers statewide.
midnightpeace_90 / Flickr

On average, kids in Louisiana public schools tested slightly better on their standardized tests this year. But New Orleans-area kids still trail behind the state, and achievment gaps for certain groups of students remain persistent.

 

This year kids were tested in math, social studies and English language arts (ELA). The state raised the bar this year for what it means to be on grade level - students now have to score at the “mastery" level to meet the standard.

 

 

 

Public schools get a large portion of their funding from local property taxes — that's taxes paid on homes and businesses, including big factories. But for decades, manufacturers in Orleans Parish have gotten a big break on those property taxes, and that means less money for schools. Now the parish school board is considering asking companies to pay up. 

U.S. Marshalls escort Ruby Bridges to integrate William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans in 1960.
United States Government

When Americans are taught the story of school desegregation, they learn about the 1954 landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. The Board of Education. But much of the work of desegregation happened outside the courtroom. Black children, some as young as six, put their bodies on the line every time they entered a white school, and nearly all of them were girls.

George Washington Carver High School class of 2018 files in for their graduation ceremony.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

At the end of George Washington Carver High School's graduation ceremony held at Xavier University at the end of May, hundreds of graduates in their white caps and gowns flood out of the auditorium to meet their families. The Carver band is playing. Girls are pulling off their high heels and unzipping their robes so they can really break it down.

On this week's edition of All Things New Orleans our education reporter, Jess Clark, chats with author Walter C. Stern about his new book "Race and Education in New Orleans". Then, we'll discuss the medical marijuana program in Texas with Morris Denton, CEO of Compassionate Cultivation

And later, Jessica Rosgaard checks in with Cityscapes columnist Richard Campanella. 

Race and Education in New Orleans traces the history of education back to 1764.
Courtesy of Walter C. Stern

When talking about the history of education in this New Orleans, school reformers often point to the problems in the school system in the decades before Hurricane Katrina: financial mismanagement, corruption and abysmal graduation rates. But one education researcher has recently written a book taking a longer view. 

Cursive Makes A Comeback In Louisiana Schools

Mar 13, 2018
Susan Roesgen / WWNO

Across the country, there's a new push to bring back an old skill. Last year, the Louisiana Legislature joined 16 other states in making cursive writing a required course in elementary schools, and the law took effect in January.

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