flooding

Travis Lux / WWNO

The flooding of August 5th, 2017 revealed that several pumps, and the generators that power them, were broken.

 

Most of that equipment has now been fixed, but last week, lawyers filed a class-action lawsuit against the New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans over damages caused by the flood waters.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with New Orleans Advocate reporter Jeff Adelson about the suit, and what comes next.

S&WB Interim Operations Manager Joe Sensebe says the board has made major repairs since Aug. 5, 2017.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

It’s been almost exactly one year since record-breaking rains flooded much of the city, and the city’s pumping and drainage system couldn’t keep up. Later it was revealed that many of the Sewerage and Water Board pumps and turbines weren’t working. Sewerage and Water Board officials say since then they've made $82 million in repairs, and today, the pumping and drainage system is in much better shape.

Travis Lux / WWNO

 

New Orleans is a city that floods. Even a small storm can leave streets impassable. City officials say they’re working on solutions, but they’re also asking citizens to help out.

All this week we’ve aired stories about how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring — heavier rains, bigger storms, extreme temperatures — and there are some serious doubts. That’s why some people are taking matters into their own hands.

Rain clouds gather over Esperanza Charter School in Mid-City. The neighborhood was hard hit during the flooding of August 2017.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Climate change is bringing more intense weather — more rain, heat and storms. And in New Orleans, extreme weather is disruptive. People park their cars up on curbs, and miss work — and school. It turns out kids missed a lot of school this past year, largely because of aging infrastructure failing during extreme weather.

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Scientists say climate change will bring heavier rains and more intense storms. City officials have acknowledged that New Orleans needs to rethink how it deals with rain — by reducing reliance on mechanical pumps and managing the water where it falls.

Thanks to a post-Katrina settlement with FEMA, the city has more than $2 billion to fix streets and drainage — a perfect opportunity to try some new ideas. But will it?

Will Brown

According to a new report, more than 40,000 Louisiana homes and 99,00 Louisiana residents are at risk of chronic flooding due to rising seas in the next 30 years. In total, 311,000 homes may be at risk across the United States.

 

The report was published by the Union of Concerned Scientists, a climate change advocacy group. Researchers made the calculation by combining sea level rise predictions with data from Zillow, an online real estate company.

Bring Your Own Presents: ‘No Baggage, Please’

Mar 7, 2018
Jonathan Bachman / Bring Your Own

This story was told on January 18th, 2018 at SBC, and later produced by Maggie Hermann. The theme of the evening was "Pipe Dreams: our Flooding Visions and Nightmares " and here, Constanza Porche describes her day navigating the roads through the August 5th flood and how she’s learned to be prepared for water in New Orleans since before she was born.

Coastal News Roundup: Nola.com/The Times-Picayune Teams With New York Times On Coastal Reporting

Feb 23, 2018
Listening Coast

This week on the Roundup we hear from the whole team at Nola.com/The Times-Picayune about a big project they just completed that goes to print Saturday. Coastal reporters Mark Schleifstein, Sara Sneath and Tristan Baurick collaborated with The New York Times on a series about the vulnerability of South Louisiana.

Travis Lux / WWNO

More than 20,000 scientists from around the world came to New Orleans this week for the American Geophysical Union conference. From minerals and volcanoes to oceans, space, and climate change -- they presented all kinds of research.

 

Sara Sneath from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune was there. So was WWNO’s Travis Lux. This week on the Coastal News Roundup, they met up at the conference to talk about the latest in coastal research.

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