History

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment. As part of the New Orleans Museum of Art’s literary ‘Arts and Letters’ series, Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with sociologist Peter Marina in front of a live audience about his book ‘Down and Out in New Orleans.’ The two discussed the various informal economies in New Orleans, and alternative lifestyles people choose as a way to live outside of mainstream society. Laine starts the conversation with what Marina’s book is inspired by.

Library of Congress

The Mississippi River has changed the landscape of New Orleans throughout the last 300 years. WWNO's Jessica Rosgaard sat down with Richard Campanella - Geographer with the Tulane School of Architecture, and columnist for NOLA-dot-com/The Times Picayune, to talk about the area along the riverfront that was once known as St. Mary’s Batture.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns to hunt down a rare artifact full of private, and personal information. Laine Kaplan-Levenson goes on the search.

When you first walk into a hospital, before you can see a doctor, you walk up to a counter in a room that sounds like this The person at the desk asks you a bunch of questions, like who's paying your bill, where you come from, your date of birth.

Touro Infirmary has been collecting this same information for over 150 years. 

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with historian Craig L. Symonds, author of “World War II at Sea: A Global History,” who will be making a visit to the National World War II Museum. Megan Holt of One Book One New Orleans, talks about what's coming up in the citywide reading initiative; this year the selection is "New Orleans: A Food Biography," by Elizabeth Williams.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod put out an episode on the legendary Lastie family — a family that holds generations of iconic musicians. I talked to drummers and first cousins Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie about their experience growing up in this musical family, what it was like to hear Professor Longhair and Dr John play in their living room, what it was like to have their introduce drums into the spiritual church, and what it was like to get yelled at by that same grandfather when they tried to play James Brown in that same spiritual church.

Photograph by Michael P. Smith / ©The Historic New Orleans Collection

Tripod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new episode that spotlights a famous musical family, the Lasties. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with drummers, and cousins, Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie. This is the first in a series of episodes focusing on the rich history of New Orleans music. Listen to the full interview with Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie here

Janet Wilson / WWNO

Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with political commentator and New Orleans native Cokie Roberts. The two discussed everything from the Me Too Movement to the 2018 midterm elections, and started local, with the city's upcoming mayoral transition.

While Best-Known For Jazz, NOLA Knows The Blues, Too

Dec 21, 2017
Cable Piano Co.

When you think about New Orleans music, you probably hear a joyful sound -- the perfect soundtrack to dancing in the street. But much of our musical heritage is rooted in a darker sound: the blues. For more about New Orleans blues, NolaVie’s Brian Friedman spoke with Professor Ric Stewart.

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Brian Friedman. 

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment, where host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sits down with a special guest for a one on one conversation. This week, Laine spoke with Isabel Wilkerson, author of “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration” while she was in town to give a talk at TEDWomen. This historical work studies the movement of African Americans who left the south for the North, Midwest, and Western parts of the United States, between 1915 and 1970.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / Flickr

New Orleans has a great new tool for music lovers. A Closer Walk is an interactive, location-based website about New Orleans music history. Just tap the map and you can find songs, rare photos, stories by local writers, and much more. One of the project’s founders, author Randy Fertel, speaks with NolaVie’s Renée Peck to share more about A Closer Walk.

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Renée Peck.

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