slavery

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns to hunt down a rare artifact full of private, and personal information. Laine Kaplan-Levenson goes on the search.

When you first walk into a hospital, before you can see a doctor, you walk up to a counter in a room that sounds like this The person at the desk asks you a bunch of questions, like who's paying your bill, where you come from, your date of birth.

Touro Infirmary has been collecting this same information for over 150 years. 

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with historian Blain Roberts, co-author, with her husband Ethan Kytle, of “Denmark Vesey’s Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy.” Who owns history in Charleston, SC? Roberts talks bout historical quandaries in memorialization and the whitewashing of slavery --in  landmarks, monuments, museums, tours for tourists.  And there's a surprising detour into musical territory as well.

Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week:

Travis Lux / WWNO

When the Mississippi River flooded this spring, tons of water gushed through the Bonnet Carré Spillway, and into Lake Pontchartrain. The spillway is a big swath of open land, and it relieves the swollen river.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a tripod Xtra produced by Laine Kaplan-Levenson. In this tripod xtra, we hear an abridged talk given by Dr. Erin Greenwald, curator of the Historic New Orleans Collection's 'The Founding Era' exhibit. Greenwald traces New Orleans' African roots -- from their kidnapping in Africa, through the middle passage, to the seminal role Africans played in the founding of our city.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with another edition of TriPod Xtras. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Dartmouth history professor Rashauna Johnson have talked before for the show. This time, their conversation was taped live during the 2017 Organization of American Historians conference that took place earlier this year. The two discussed Johnson’s first book, Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions, which won the 2016 Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history.

Sandra Green Thomas

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history, and an attempt at reconciliation. Listen to Part I here

We left off at the Sold South Panel that took place in New Orleans in December of 2016. The discussion centered around something Georgetown University did in 1838 when the institution sold 272 enslaved people to two plantations in Louisiana to avoid bankruptcy.

Georgetown University

TriPod: New Orleans @300 returns with the first in a two-part series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history. In 1838, Jesuits from Georgetown University sold 272 people to Louisiana. Listen to Part II here.

On the grounds of Whitney Plantation. Former slave quarters are on the right with Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall visible in the background.
Sarah Holtz

In this special edition of Louisiana Eats, we celebrate the 151st anniversary of Juneteenth — the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

In 1834, artist George Catlin witnessed Choctaw lacrosse in Indian Territory near present-day Oklahoma.
George Catlin / Smithsonian American Art Museum

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new story about an indigenous sport that became popular before the Civil War.


Image of the St. Malo Maroon community from an 1883 edition of Harper's Weekly.
The Historic New Orleans Collection

You live in a cave, six feet underground. You’re surrounded by wild animals, swarms of mosquitos, thick mud, and you can only come out at night. Why? Because it beats being a slave.

“They could live there for five, seven, 10 years”, says Sylviane Diouf, director of the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, New York.

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