City of New Orleans

New Orleans' Gun Violence Reduction Plan

New Orleans’ homicide rate has fallen in recent decades, but the city still has one of the highest murder rates in the country. Each year since 1972, at least 145 people have been murdered in New Orleans. And nearly all of the victims were killed by firearms. Mayor LaToya Cantrell has just announced a new plan to tackle gun violence. WWNO’s Karl Lengel spoke with Joshua Cox, the Mayor's Director of Strategic Initiatives, about the new Gun Violence Reduction Plan. The plan is available on the...

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The Helis Foundation

Arts Council's 'Unframed' And The Power Of Public Art

New Orleans is getting a lot more colorful lately. Local and national artists are turning blank brick and concrete walls into massive outdoor artworks, including five new murals that were recently unveiled on downtown buildings. NolaVie’s Renée Peck speaks to Arts Council Director Heidi Schmalbach about new movements in public art and how it can transform the local community. Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Renée Peck.

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Trump Announces Higher Tariffs On Goods From China After Dow Plunges 623 Points

Updated at 5:18 p.m. ET President Trump on Friday announced higher tariffs on goods from China, hours after Beijing said it will slap tariffs on $75 billion of autos and other U.S. goods. Earlier in the day, he "ordered" U.S. companies to stop doing business with China though it was unclear whether he had the power to do that. Trump tweeted that starting Oct. 1, $250 billion worth of goods from China currently being taxed at 25% will face tariffs of 30%. And, starting Sept. 1, $300 billion...

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City of New Orleans

New Orleans’ homicide rate has fallen in recent decades, but the city still has one of the highest murder rates in the country. Each year since 1972, at least 145 people have been murdered in New Orleans. And nearly all of the victims were killed by firearms. Mayor LaToya Cantrell has just announced a new plan to tackle gun violence. WWNO’s Karl Lengel spoke with Joshua Cox, the Mayor's Director of Strategic Initiatives, about the new Gun Violence Reduction Plan.

The Helis Foundation

New Orleans is getting a lot more colorful lately. Local and national artists are turning blank brick and concrete walls into massive outdoor artworks, including five new murals that were recently unveiled on downtown buildings. NolaVie’s Renée Peck speaks to Arts Council Director Heidi Schmalbach about new movements in public art and how it can transform the local community.

American Routes Shortcuts: Big Jay McNeely

Aug 23, 2019
Big Jay McNeely
American Routes

At the most human scale Los Angeles is defined by the scenes along legendary streets: Sunset Boulevard, Melrose, La Brea, and Central Avenue. Beginning in the 1920s, Central Avenue was the place to hear jazz, later R&B and bebop. For the late tenor sax player Big Jay McNeely, the scene began on Central Avenue.

Ian McNulty

A Hubig’s pie was a humble pie. But it had a huge place in the heart of New Orleans. Want proof? Just look at the response when the first little blip of good news on the future of Hubig’s hit the headlines.

A three-day celebration of the life of Kathleen Babineaux Blanco begins Thursday in Baton Rouge.

Every seat in the Louisiana Legislature is up for election this October. A third of those races have already been decided, as candidates went unopposed.

This week on Inside the Arts, an arts "happy hour" known as Culture Collision kicks off its 11th celebration in the Arts District. Spokeswoman and WWNO business manager Jametta Youngblood stops by for a chat.

Then, the NOLA Project Theatre Company announces its new season celebrating 15 years of bold, innovative productions. Artistic director A.J. Allegra joins us.

This week on Thinking Outside the Book: Book conservators Sabrena Johnson and Sara White take us on a tour of the off-site facility for Tulane libraries, where overflow from the stacks is awaiting reader requests and books, papers, and posters stay very cool in the summer heat and books go to be repaired and restored.

Jessica Rosgaard / WWNO

Rainstorms seem to be getting more intense. In New Orleans, every time it rains, people worry about flooding. A new study from LSU finds that storms in Louisiana are getting bigger and wetter, dropping more rain over a shorter period of time.

WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with state climatologist Barry Keim and LSU research associate, Vinny Brown, who looked at climate data going back to the 1960’s.

Louisiana's first female governor, Kathleen Blanco, passed away Sunday, August 18, after a battle with cancer.

Blanco was 76. She had been diagnosed with her second round of cancer in 2017 and died at a Lafayette hospice center she entered earlier this year.

Blanco served as governor from 2004 to 2008, choosing not to run for a second term after having led the state through Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which devastated the region.  

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LE SHOW

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

Le Show For The Week Of August 18, 2019

This week on Le Show Harry brings us News of the Olympic Movement, The New Iraq, News of the Warm, Dominion, The Appresidentice, News of Microplastics, The Apologies of the Week, plus music by David Crosby, Fountains of Wayne, Jon Cleary and more.

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THE READING LIFE

George Ingmire / The Reading Life

The Reading Life with Minrose Gwin and Kate Lacour

This week on the Reading Life: Susan talks with Minrose Gwin, whose most recent novel is “The Accidentals.” We’ll also hear from Kate Lacour, whose odd and beautiful new art book is “Vivisectionary: A Convocation of Biological Art.”

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FOOD & DINING

Ian McNulty

Where Y’Eat: Why New Orleans Is In a Hurry to Get Its Hubig’s Pies Back

A Hubig’s pie was a humble pie. But it had a huge place in the heart of New Orleans. Want proof? Just look at the response when the first little blip of good news on the future of Hubig’s hit the headlines.

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