LOCAL NEWS

New Orleans City Planning Commission

Bywater Development Would Create Affordable Housing, But Raises Questions

The Housing Authority of New Orleans is proposing a new affordable housing project on land it owns in the Bywater. The development would have 150 units, 90 of which would be rented at affordable prices. A Texas-based real estate company called ITEX would build and manage the new property in return for subsidies and tax credits.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Modern Classics Remembers André Previn

The acclaimed pianist, composer, arranger and conductor André Previn passed away on February 28th. He would've been 90 in just a few weeks.
On this week's episode of "Modern Classics", we'll hear Augustin Hadelich and Joyce Yang play Previn's 2003 composition "Tango, Song and Dance". Also on the program -- Joan Tower's "Petroushkates" and a pair of concert pieces by John Williams. Joan Tower -- Petroushkates André Previn -- Tango, Song and Dance John Williams -- Bassoon Concerto "Five...

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President Trump Backs Israeli Sovereignty Claim Over Golan Heights

The Trump administration has backed Israel's claim to sovereignty over the Golan Heights. The move comes weeks before Israeli general elections and reverses the position U.S. administrations have held for decades. President Trump made the announcement via tweet Thursday. "After 52 years it is time for the United States to fully recognize Israel's Sovereignty over the Golan Heights, which is of critical strategic and security importance to the State of Israel and Regional Stability!" the...

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Dancing Grounds

Simply the word gentrification is enough to spark heated debate, especially in a city as steeped in history and as fiercely loyal to its neighborhoods as New Orleans. A young dance troupe is addressing the issue in a singular way. NolaVie’s Brian Friedman invited Jeremy Guyton, youth program director for Dancing Grounds, as well as Akelah Sabreen, a student in the program, into the studio to discuss their upcoming festival, which is called Dance for Social Change.

 

American Routes Shortcuts: Brandi Carlile

6 hours ago
Brandi Carlile
American Routes

Songmaker Brandi Carlile was raised in the Northwest country, but has lived half her life on the road as a gigging musician. After dropping out of high school, Brandi busked on the streets of Seattle, where she met long-time collaborators, the twin brothers, Tim and Phil Hanseroth. She quickly signed to Columbia Records for a self-titled album. Since then, Brandi has made acclaimed records with producers T-Bone Burnett and Rick Rubin. She went it alone in 2015 for Firewatcher's Daughter earning a Grammy nomination for Best Americana Album.

New Orleans City Planning Commission

The Housing Authority of New Orleans is proposing a new affordable housing project on land it owns in the Bywater. The development would have 150 units, 90 of which would be rented at affordable prices. A Texas-based real estate company called ITEX would build and manage the new property in return for subsidies and tax credits.

The acclaimed pianist, composer, arranger and conductor André Previn passed away on February 28th. He would've been 90 in just a few weeks.

On this week's episode of "Modern Classics", we'll hear Augustin Hadelich and Joyce Yang play Previn's 2003 composition "Tango, Song and Dance".

Also on the program -- Joan Tower's "Petroushkates" and a pair of concert pieces by John Williams.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The state’s cornerstone coastal restoration project has been delayed. The announcement was made in Baton Rouge at the monthly Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority Board meeting.

If constructed, the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion would build land by diverting some of the muddy Mississippi River water through a controlled structure along the river levee, and into nearby marshes.

Despite continued pushback from commercial fishing groups, state officials are eager to get the project built quickly. Last year, the state signed an agreement with the federal government that would speed up the timeline for the project by about two years.

Travis Lux / WWNO

After a couple years of billing issues, the Sewerage and Water Board (SWB) said last fall that citizens owed the utility about $23 million dollars. Now, it turns out that number is even higher.

At a city council committee meeting on Tuesday, council member Joe Giarrusso revealed that the number is currently closer to $130 million.

Author Nathaniel Rich on Climate Change, April 4

Mar 19, 2019

Be in the audience on Thursday, April 4, when WWNO’s Coastal Reporter Tegan Wendland interviews author Nathaniel Rich about his new book, Losing Earth: A Recent History.  Rich argues that by 1979 we knew nearly everything we know today about climate change, and how to stop it. In Losing Earth, Rich chronicles the next decade’s desperate campaign by a small number of scientists, politicians, and others to act before we lose the chance to save the earth.

Photo Credit: Paul Kolnik

This week on Inside the Arts, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater rolls into town.  The New Orleans Ballet Association [NOBA] presents the return of the legendary modern dance company as it celebrates 60 years of African American culture through dance.  We talk with artistic director Robert Battle.

Then, a heads up for classical music and opera lovers. The Symphony Book Fair is holding a special event that could enrich your collection of music as well as books.  LPO volunteer and New Orleans Opera associate Philip Straub joins us with details.

Louisiana’s legislature is about three weeks away from the start of a fiscal session. For two months, lawmakers will debate tax policies in the state.  Taking center stage could be a bill from Representative Tanner Magee (R-Houma). 

A new Tulane study shows school reforms increased expulsions in New Orleans, but that school corrected course due to mounting public pressure.
DCJOHN / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

A new study from Tulane University’s Education Research Alliance looks into how charter school reforms impacted New Orleans' expulsion and suspension rates. Researchers found that the reforms increased expulsion rates in the first few years after the state took over the city's schools, but that after mounting public pressure and a lawsuit, expulsion rates dropped back down.

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LE SHOW

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

Le Show For The Week Of March 17, 2019

On this edition of Le Show Harry Shearer bring us an interview with Pultizer Prize-winning environmental journalist, Bob Marshall.

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THE READING LIFE

The Reading Life with Albert Woodfox

This week on The Reading Life: New Orleans native Albert Woodfox, author of “Solitary: My Journey of Transformation and Hope.” He is the last of the group known as the Angola 3 to be released from the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola. This memoir describes his early life, as well as how he survived more than four decades in solitary confinement, more than any other incarcerated man in America.

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FOOD & DINING

Ian McNulty

Where Y’Eat: In New Orleans, a Toast to the Gift of Irish Hospitality

Confession time: I’m Irish, I obsess over food and I have long envied the relationship my Italian friends have with their culinary heritage. This always comes to a boil in March, with St. Patrick’s Day and St. Joseph’s Day essentially running together.

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*TriPod: New Orleans at 300* is WWNO’s FRESH radio history of New Orleans, released in weekly segments as our city approaches its Tricentennial in 2018.
Susan Larson, host of The Reading Life, talks with local authors and readers about their favorite books from three hundred years of New Orleans literature.