Eve Abrams

Producer

Eve Abrams first fell in love with stories listening to her grandmother tell them; it’s been an addiction ever since.

Eve is a radio producer, writer, audio documentarian, and educator. Her work airs on WWNO, as well as on national programs such as the Tavis Smiley Show, Studio 360, The World, and This American Life. Her writing is published in the 2010 collection Where We Know: New Orleans as Home, as well as in Fourth Genre, Wesleyan Magazine, and the forthcoming New Orleans atlas, Unfathomable City. She is also the co-author of the book Preservation Hall.

Eve has taught in public and charter schools, both in New Orleans and New York City, and currently teaches writing at the Waldo Burton School and an audio workshop at Tulane University.

Cheryl Gerber

The Myth Justice is Blind to Money, Part 2, tells the story of one prior attempt to get rid of money bail and how this attempt was thwarted by the status quo. It’s a dive into systems and the difficulty of dismantling a system as complex as our nation’s criminal legal system.

Merle Cooper

Season 2 of Unprisoned begins with a three-part series called The Myth Justice is Blind to Money.

George Washington Carver High School students Kennis Fairley (left), Marneisha Gilmore and Jacorey Warner.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Over the last four weeks, WWNO has brought listeners our series "This Is Why It Matters" - stories about people our community has lost to gun violence.

‘He Was Like A Real Brother To Me’: Remembering Deshaun Singleton

Nov 6, 2019
Jacorey Warner [left] is interviewed by his friend and classmate Marneisha Gilmore about his friend Deshaun Singleton.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Our student-produced series “This Is Why It Matters” is about the people our community has lost to gun violence.

Carver junior Kennis Fairley and drama teacher Ateja Lewis.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Our student-produced series “This Is Why It Matters” is about the lives of people our community has lost to gun violence. One thing students at George Washington Carver High School discovered in their reporting is that students aren’t the only people at school struggling with grief - many Carver teachers are grappling with the emotional toll of having lost students to homicide. Some teachers are also survivors of their own trauma.

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