Eve Abrams

Producer

Eve Abrams first fell in love with stories listening to her grandmother tell them; it’s been an addiction ever since.

Eve is a radio producer, writer, audio documentarian, and educator. Her work airs on WWNO, as well as on national programs such as the Tavis Smiley Show, Studio 360, The World, and This American Life. Her writing is published in the 2010 collection Where We Know: New Orleans as Home, as well as in Fourth Genre, Wesleyan Magazine, and the forthcoming New Orleans atlas, Unfathomable City. She is also the co-author of the book Preservation Hall.

Eve has taught in public and charter schools, both in New Orleans and New York City, and currently teaches writing at the Waldo Burton School and an audio workshop at Tulane University.

Jazz and Heritage Archive

When the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival first began in 1969, it was radical. Here in the South, still reeling from the Civil Rights movement and race integration, the festivals’ founders — Quint Davis, George Wein, and Allison Miner — created a safe space for New Orleanians to come together, to hear each others’ music and to party — together. Eve Abrams brings us this profile of Allison Miner, a titan in New Orleans music, and the only person with a Jazz Fest stage named for her.

Katy Reckdahl

If you own a dog in New Orleans, there are two places where your dog can legally run around off-leash: your yard and City Bark, the private dog park in City Park.

The New Orleans Recreation Development Commission wants to change that. NORD-C has selected two off-leash dog-runs for each district, but with city money tight there’s no telling when they’ll be built.

Eugenia Uhl

High school marching bands have two main seasons: football and Carnival. But unlike football season, where bands briefly entertain sports fans during half time shows, Carnival season is a marathon of long songs, marching, and discipline. It’s also a time when the musicians, not the athletes, compete.

Eve Abrams visited two of New Orleans’ rival high school marching bands: MacDonough 35 and Warren Easton.

Abigail Feldman

You see it in your neighborhood or on your way to work: an abandoned house or empty lot — a small piece of New Orleans which once belonged to someone, but now, is sagging or overgrown or both.

Scott Threlkeld / The Advocate

The Housing Authority of New Orleans received a Federal grant last year to redevelop the Iberville Housing Development, the city’s last traditional public housing complex, on the edge of the French Quarter. The plan was to keep about a third of the buildings, demolish the rest, and build new, mixed-income housing.

Dacia Idom

When teenagers look for a job, they often seek skills and training just as much as money. But for kids growing up without abundant resources, opportunities for developing confidence, humility, and a good work ethic can be hard to come by. Yet one New Orleans program, the Grow Dat Youth Farm, provides all of this and more in one fell swoop.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

When a prisoner calls home to talk to his mother, son, or daughter, that call costs his family about 15 times more than it would if the same number were dialed outside the prison walls.  These costs vary from one jail to the next, but every Louisiana prison receives a hefty kickback from the collect phone calls inmates make simply to stay in touch with their friends and families.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

When Hurricane Isaac blew through Louisiana, it caused an estimated $100 million worth of losses in agriculture. About 40% of the state’s citrus crop was destroyed, and in Plaquemines Parish, where most of our citrus comes from, nearly half the citrus acres were flooded.

Farmers in the worst hit areas are cleaning up. Meanwhile, the luckier farmers worry about the next time. All of them told Eve Abrams the future of Louisiana’s commercial citrus industry does not look good.

Craig Mulcahy

College and high school classes are different. And, surprisingly, what many high schools do in the interest of college prep is out of step with what liberal arts colleges actually want.

In New Orleans, where our successful future depends upon thinkers who can unravel complex problems, there’s one school actively selecting students based on their curiosity and drive, rather than their grades and test scores.  Eve Abrams steps inside the admissions process at Bard Early College in New Orleans.

Mental Health Care

May 24, 2012
Eve Abrams / WWNO

One enduring legacy of Hurricane Katrina and the storm's aftermath is stress.  Stress about  home, family, money, environment, and on and on.  But stress doesn’t stay stress; it has a tendency to become other things.  Eve Abrams investigates how dealing with hard situations, in a New Orleans helping fewer mental-health patients, has affected the health, safety, and moral compass/future of our city.

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