Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian covers food culture and dining in New Orleans through his weekly commentary series Where Y’Eat. 

Ian is also a staff writer for the daily newspaper the New Orleans Advocate, covering the culture, personality and trends behind the city’s famous dining scene.

He is the author of two books - “Louisiana Rambles: Exploring America’s Cajun and Creole Heartland,” a travel narrative about south Louisiana culture, and “A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina,” an account of the first months in the city after Hurricane Katrina.

He has been a contributor to WWNO since 2009.

Ian McNulty

It was just another Halloween display at small house on a Mid-City side street, but it stopped me in my tracks. There were foam headstones, standard issue Halloween décor, except these were customized with the names of restaurants and bars we have recently lost

Ian McNulty

Lately, my drink of choice has not been about on what's in the cup so much as where I get it.

I’ve been visiting bars around New Orleans, which would not normally qualify as noteworthy but these days we’re taking nothing for granted.



Ian McNulty

On the same day everyone felt the weather change in New Orleans, I heard a marching band practicing at a distance, as if rising from a football stadium somewhere. To me, the sound of that bass drum signaled fall just as clearly as the weather forecast. What happened next was inevitable: I had to have gumbo right away.

Ian McNulty

When Ramona Young hands the carton of seafood stew over the takeout window at Queen’s Cuisine, it’s hard to believe such a generous feast of shrimp and crab and sausage and spice can even fit through the small frame.

Ian McNulty

Each week, there’s news of more well known New Orleans restaurants reopening, from Dooky Chase’s to Commander’s Palace. And each time you can practically hear New Orleans food lovers cheering them on. It’s natural. We root for our own, and we support them through the slow summers here and rally for them when some calamity strikes.

But as the drumbeat of reopenings continue and the dangers of the coronavirus crisis stretch on, we have to remember how different this struggle is from all the others, and what’s at stake.   

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