Jess Clark

Education Desk Reporter

Jess Clark is WWNO's Education Desk reporter. Jess comes to the station after two years as Fletcher Fellow for Education Policy Reporting for North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC (Chapel Hill). Her reporting has aired on national programs, including NPR's All Things ConsideredHere & Now from WBURand NPR's Weekend Edition

Originally from Louisville, Kentucky, Jess graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2015 with a master's in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Ways to Connect

New Orleans resident Pat Bryant was among dozens who spoke out against the new power plant.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

After more than seven hours of testimony from New Orleans residents, business owners and Entergy executives, the New Orleans City Council utilities committee moved forward a resolution to approve a new gas-fired power plant in New Orleans East. 

Carver senior and drum major Mytrell Allen leads the band during Muses.
Natalie Yahr

High school marching bands spend months preparing to entertain Carnival revelers along parade routes and compete for prime spots near the front of the parade. One school with a rich marching tradition is George Washington Carver High School in the Ninth Ward. But the school was destroyed in Hurricane Katrina, and it took several years for Carver to restart a marching band. 

Strip club workers and their supporters made their case against reducing the number of French Quarter strip clubs at a public hearing.
Jess / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

The New Orleans City Planning Commission recommended easing back on a cap on French Quarter strip clubs Tuesday, after more than 100 strip club workers and their supporters showed up to make their case at a hearing.

Hundreds of strip club workers and their supporters marched through the French Quarter Thursday, protesting police raids that have left them out of work.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Hundreds of strip club workers and their supporters marched through the French Quarter Thursday night, protesting police raids on clubs that have left them out of work. 

Lusher Charter School is among the top performing schools in New Orleans, but they're not easy to get into.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

In Part One of this series we heard about how one family is navigating the school enrollment process. Turns out, when you're trying to get into the best schools, it's complicated. There are a lot of steps. And it's hard even for someone with resources. WWNO's Jess Clark brings us back to the story of Kate Scheuermann and her son Remy. Kate is a sales manager for WWNO, and she's trying to get Remy into first grade at the district's top schools.

Remy Scheuermann poses with his father Craig Scheuerman after completing his test at Lusher Charter School. The Scheuermanns are trying to get Remy into first grade at some of the highest-demand schools.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Families across New Orleans are deciding where to send their kids to school next year. Parents can now use the district’s OneApp — an online application that allows you to apply to many schools at once. The district then tries to match students to their first choice. But when you want to get into the top schools, it's not all that simple.

Jessica Rosgaard

Road conditions are improving as southeast Louisiana continues to thaw from a deep freeze. But problems with the water system have school districts closed and city officials warning residents to be prepared for a few more difficult days ahead.

Teachers at Kids of Excellence in New Orleans start the morning off with songs in circle time.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

In part one of WWNO's series on early child care and education in Louisiana, we heard about how costs are keeping many families from accessing quality early childhood education. But costs are also having an impact on child care centers themselves.  In part two, we look at whether children are getting quality instruction when families can afford to send them to licensed centers.

Shawanda Jefferson picks up her four-year-old son at the unregulated child care center — her only option due to costs.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Most kids enter the public school system at age five. But scientists say that, actually, it’s the first four years of a child’s life that are the most important for learning and brain development. High-quality early child care and education can set a child up for success in life. But can Louisiana families get access to it? And are child care facilities providing it? We investigate in a two-part series. Part One: How cost is a barrier for families seeking early childhood education.

 

Listen to Part Two here, on whether New Orleans toddlers are getting quality instruction when they're families can afford to send them to licensed centers.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu signed budget ammendments Monday that allocate $750,000 to pre-K.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu signed a 2018 city budget amendment Monday that appropriates $750,000 for pre-K for low-income children in New Orleans.

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