Election 2012

Follow 89.9 WWNO and NPR News on the road to Election Day with this mix of local and national stories.

Live Election Coverage Begins Tuesday, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m.

 

As the polls close on the East Coast, WWNO and NPR's Election Night Coverage begins at 7 p.m. All Things Considered's Robert Siegel and Melissa Block will be joined by NPR Contributors E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and Matt Continetti of the Washington Free Beacon. Andrew Kohut and Michael Dimock of the Pew Research Center will have exit poll analysis.

NPR's Ari Shapiro will report from the Mitt Romney's  election night event and Scott Horsley will be at President Obama's election night event. NPR reporters and producers will be stationed with candidates and at state party headquarters nationwide, bringing the results and mood from key electoral states and Congressional, Senate, and Gubernatorial races.

Locally, WWNO's Jack Hopke will be joined by Errol Laborde, producer of WYES' Informed Sources and editor of New Orleans Magazine. Listen for local election updates on the hour and half-hour from 7 - 10 p.m.

A "return on investment" is a concept better known to Wall Street than to Washington. But after President Obama and the Democrats won most of the close elections last week there are questions about the seven- and eight-figure "investments" made by dozens of conservative donors.

During the election season, it was pretty common to hear about donors making "investments" in superPACs and other outside groups, rather than a "political contribution," perhaps because the phrase has a sort of taint to it.

Democratic Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin's sexual orientation was never really a factor in her victorious campaign against Republican former Gov. Tommy Thompson. Advocates for gay rights see that as a watershed moment for the movement.

Baldwin won a seat many thought she couldn't, defeating one of the state's most successful politicians in the process. The celebration Tuesday night in Madison was euphoric.

The enthusiastic crowd was never louder than when Baldwin acknowledged making history.

Just because there's more fact checking, doesn't mean there's more truth telling.

Given this, David Carr of The New York Times declared that journalistic efforts to set the record straight during "the most fact-checked [presidential] election in history" didn't work.

Here's a lighter story to round-out this election week.

On Tuesday, 27-year-old Bobby McDonald ran for one of six city council seats in the town of Walton, Ky., population 3,724.

"The night of Election Day, I was watching the results come in," he told NPR's Guy Raz. "And I ended up in a tie with the other candidate."

McDonald was tied 669-669 with his opponent, Olivia Ballou.

"There're many ways you can tie," McDonald said. "But in my situation, I let my wife sleep in and not go vote that day. And she's mad at me cause I did not wake her up."

Four Days Later, Florida Declares For Obama

Nov 10, 2012

Four days after the polls closed, Florida has announced that President Obama won the state's 29 electoral votes. As the AP writes:

"That gives the president a total of 332 electoral votes to Mitt Romney's 206. Florida officials said Obama had 50 percent of the vote to Romney's 49.1 percent, a margin of about 74,000 votes."

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