Jazz Fest Minutes

Weekdays through May 3rd
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Learn a lot about the top performers at this year’s Jazz Fest in just a little while, with a fresh set of WWNO’s multi-award-winning Jazz Fest Minutes. Join producer Fred Kasten for these 120-second profiles, and find out about the musical backgrounds, influences and inspirations (and even sample some of the music!) of a diverse cross-section of the artists performing at this year’s New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival presented by Shell. These twenty spots will cover them all, from multiple Grammy winners to those deserving wider recognition.

Catch Jazz Fest Minutes weekdays through May 3 right here on 89.9 WWNO — New Orleans Public Radio, at 7:59 a.m., during Morning Edition; at 1:04 p.m., just after the news from NPR; at 5:59 p.m., during All Things Considered; and anytime at all right here at WWNO.org!

Jazz Fest Minutes: Singer-Songwriter Eric Lindell

May 5, 2013

Singer-songwriter Eric Lindell’s music has a soulful quality that is redolent of New Orleans. But he grew up in Sonoma County, California.

nicholaspayton.com

Nicholas Payton is one brilliant musician. He plays just about everything on the bandstand very well. He’s best known for his trumpet work but is also a dynamic keyboard player, and even manages to play superbly on both at the same time.

In recent years Payton has added another tool to his kit: singing.

pasionporelteatromusical.blogspot.com/

The Show “One Mo’ Time” went from humble beginnings as a homemade New Orleans labor of love with a single scheduled performance to a worldwide theatrical sensation that ran for years. Its creator, New Orleans actor Vernel Bagneris, has loved the idea of putting on a show from way back.

“Cousins of mine still laugh at the fact that they used to come over and I’d put on a show for them and play a little accordion and single a little bit with the few chords I knew on a piano and do plays and make them all do parts,” Bagneris remembers.

Trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis got a good lesson and lasting influence out of a teenage attempt to hornswoggle a new trombone from older brother Wynton. The lesson and the influence came in the form of a recording by trombone great J.J. Johnson.

tonydagradi.com

Saxophonist and Astral Project founder Tony Dagradi grew up in Summit, New Jersey. By high school he knew what he wanted to do: play jazz.

“It was almost as if I didn’t have a choice,” he says. “I didn’t think about, well, how much money am I going to make or how do I get a gig. I was just — all I wanted to do was play.”

After a couple of years at the Berklee School of Music in Boston, Dagradi entered an intense period of jazz rehearsal and listening.

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