Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.

 

Subscribe to Where Y'Eat as a podcast:

1. Open Itunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: itpc://wwno.org/podcasts/6095/rss.xml

And that’s it! New episodes download automatically.

Ways to Connect

Fried catfish at Barrow's Catfish is based on the family recipe from Barrow's Shady Inn.
Ian McNulty

Old family recipes endure in New Orleans, and one has carried on for generations from the old Barrow’s Shady Inn to the modern Barrow‘s Catfish. These days, it’s also part of an encouraging success story amid the coronavirus crisis.

Ian McNulty

You’ve had BBQ shrimp six ways to Sunday. How about BBQ crawfish? Served over grits, buttery, boldly spicy, just a bit sweet, it's a signature flavor at Backatown Coffee Parlour. It’s also part of an effort to sustain a singular black-owned community space through the coronavirus crisis so that it can return to its original purpose, one badly in need now.

Ian McNulty

My dad cooked breakfast a lot when I was growing up. Pancakes were big, but no matter what he made the meal usually included a little baloney, and I don’t mean the sandwich meat.

Ian McNulty

Change, uplift, expression. Some ideas now coursing through this moment in history are the same that inspired the transformation of a once-familiar spot in the Marigny. It’s one black entrepreneur's vision at the convergence of art, literature and civic interaction, balanced by a nice cocktail or two.

Ian McNulty

A good restaurant tip is gold in this town. New Orleans people covet them, cultivate them, exchange them. But when it comes to one particularly rich vein of restaurant intel, the response by some tells me they aren’t thinking with their bellies, or that maybe the trouble is in their hearts. These are lists of black-owned restaurants that regularly circulate on social media.

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