Arts & Culture

American Routes Shortcuts: Yvette Landry

May 29, 2020
Yvette Landry
American Routes

Yvette Landry wears many hats: musician, songwriter, educator, author, and record producer. Hailing from Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, Yvette grew up listening to music but wasn’t interested in playing music until later in life. After her dad was diagnosed with cancer, Yvette bought a bass for Cajun jam sessions with the Lafayette Rhythm Devils. She went on to join the female-led Cajun band Bonsoir, Catin, and now fronts the Yvette Landry Band.

Dancing Grounds annual Dance for Social Change Festival kicks off this week, virtually via ZOOM. It will focus on issues of gentrification and COVID-19 in New Orleans, featuring a panel discussion with local leaders, dance classes and a film premiere of an original performance piece by its teen dancers. We talk with Dancing Grounds youth programs manager, Randall Rosenberg.

The festival runs May 25th thru 29th. All events are free, but you must pre-register at dancingrounds.org for a link to the activities. 

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

On this edition of Le Show Harry brings us News of the Warm, News of the Godly, Lake Reverie, News of Microplastics, The Apologies of the Week, News from the Land of 15,000 Princes, original music, and more.

How You See Me

May 22, 2020

Enrique García Naranjo is stopped by border patrol. Aydrea Walden realizes her classmates see her differently. Miles Crabtree tries out for his school's production of "How the West Was Won." Kimberly Rose sees herself disappearing in her marriage.
Jessi Klein lands what she thinks is her dream job.

2019 National Heritage Fellows
National Endowment for the Arts

This week, we're celebrating the National Heritage Fellows, past and present. It’s our annual tribute to great traditional artists, musicians, storytellers, and craftspersons, who have been recognized by the National Endowment for the Arts since 1982. 

 

 

Nick Spitzer: Grant Bulltail, a 2019 Heritage Fellow is a native of Crow Agency, Montana, and comes from a family of storytellers who held the history of the Apsáalooke people. Grant spoke of his path in storytelling and sustaining his family’s traditions. 

Pages