BP oil spill

After The Spill: A Deepwater Horizon Oral History

Apr 17, 2020
Keely Merritt / The Historic New Orleans Collection

April 20th is the 10-year anniversary of the BP Oil Spill, which was the largest marine oil spill in history. In the aftermath of the environmental disaster, The Historic New Orleans Collection began collecting oral histories from individuals who were on the ground cleaning up the Gulf and its wildlife. Bart Siegel was a volunteer who rescued and rehabilitated pelicans in Venice, Louisiana. He shared those experiences and his ongoing monitoring work for this edition of NOLA Life Stories.

 

 

10 Years After BP Oil Spill, A Volunteer Remembers The Pelicans

Mar 20, 2020
Keely Merritt / The Historic New Orleans Collection

Next month marks 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill that took lives and damaged the Gulf Coast and its wildlife. In the wake of the disaster, the Louisiana State Animal Response Team dispatched a crew of volunteers to care for thousands of oiled pelicans. Jean Beaston was one of those volunteers. From her home in Youngsville, Louisiana, she chronicled her experiences at the bird rescue center in this edition of NOLA Life Stories.

 

U.S. Coast Guard/Getty Images

Saturday is the nine-year anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Today, we take a look at how offshore drilling safety has changed since then, and what the government has done to prevent disasters in the future.

For this week’s coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Tegan Wendland gets the answers from Loyola law professor, Rob Verchick.

Tech. Sgt. Adrian Cadiz / U.S. Air Force

During the BP oil spill in 2010, responders used chemical dispersants to break up the oil. Recent studies have questioned both the safety and efficacy of those chemicals. Other studies have suggested that those concerns are overblown.

So which is it? Are dispersants dangerous? Or are they not? And why is it so hard to figure out?

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times Picayune, sorts it all out with WWNO’s Travis Lux.

Deepwater Horizon Response/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

The chemicals used to help clean up the BP oil spill, known as dispersants, have been already been accused of damaging the health of humans and sea life. Now, a new study says they were ineffective at doing what they were meant to do: clean up the oil.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO's Travis Lux speak with Nola.com/The Times-Picayune's Tristan Baurick about the study. Plus, a look at the black rail -- a coastal bird threatened by sea level rise.

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