BP oil spill

U.S. Coast Guard/Getty Images

Saturday is the nine-year anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Today, we take a look at how offshore drilling safety has changed since then, and what the government has done to prevent disasters in the future.

For this week’s coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Tegan Wendland gets the answers from Loyola law professor, Rob Verchick.

Tech. Sgt. Adrian Cadiz / U.S. Air Force

During the BP oil spill in 2010, responders used chemical dispersants to break up the oil. Recent studies have questioned both the safety and efficacy of those chemicals. Other studies have suggested that those concerns are overblown.

So which is it? Are dispersants dangerous? Or are they not? And why is it so hard to figure out?

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times Picayune, sorts it all out with WWNO’s Travis Lux.

Deepwater Horizon Response/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

The chemicals used to help clean up the BP oil spill, known as dispersants, have been already been accused of damaging the health of humans and sea life. Now, a new study says they were ineffective at doing what they were meant to do: clean up the oil.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO's Travis Lux speak with Nola.com/The Times-Picayune's Tristan Baurick about the study. Plus, a look at the black rail -- a coastal bird threatened by sea level rise.

Coastal News Roundup: Oil Spill Edition

Apr 20, 2018
SkyTruth / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

It was eight years ago today that the Deepwater Horizon oil rig blew up, spewing more than 160 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over several months.

Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council

Much of the money the state plans to get through the BP oil spill settlement will go toward big construction projects -- building barrier islands and levees.

 

Some of that money is reserved for coastal research projects, and the first projects have been announced.

 

One of the big ways the scientific research gets done on the coast is through specific projects. The state or the feds have money for a project -- like a barrier island -- and they might ask scientists to look into something for them.

This week on All Things New Orleans, NOPD Superintendent Michael Harrison shares details about the city's new false alarm ordinance which goes into effect on May 1, 2017.

Then, we look back seven years ago to the damage caused by the BP Oil Disaster and share a story from coastal scientist Estelle Robichaux.

Oystermen at work on Lake Borgne in 1973.
John Messina / Environmental Protection Agency

Despite what your parents may have told you about eating oysters in the summer, it’s perfectly fine to do that. That’s from the lips of Alfred Sunseri, whose family has run the P&J Oyster Company since 1876. He knows a thing or two about the business and shares his family's triumphs and their frustrations in this interview with The Historic New Orleans Collection's oral historian, Mark Cave. 

Ryan Hagerty, National Digital Library of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service

When John Bel Edwards starts his new job as governor in January he will face lots of big decisions on how to spend BP settlement money and bring in more capital to restore the eroding coast.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

It’s settled – BP has to pay $20 billion for the gulf oil spill in 2010. The deal announced Monday finalizes civil claims and ends five years of legal fighting.

The Department of Justice says BP has to pay Clean Water Act fines and settle with the five gulf states that were impacted - Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas.

Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority / http://cims.coastal.louisiana.gov/FLOODRISK/

Entrepreneurs and businesspeople met at the New Orleans business incubator Propeller on Thursday night to learn about how they can help restore the coast.

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