climate change

GNOF

As climate change brings more extreme temperatures, bigger storms and heavier rainfall, people of all backgrounds are affected. But research has shown that low-income people and people of color are disproportionately impacted. They often live in low-lying areas that flood more or in urban neighborhoods that become “heat islands." They often fall through the cracks when it comes to government disaster assistance.

On Monday city officials released a new plan to try to address those inequities. It’s a collaboration with the Greater New Orleans Foundation and the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice.

Tegan Wendland talked with Ramsey Green, Deputy CAO of Infrastructure and Chief Resilience Officer for the City of New Orleans, about what the plan entails.

IPCC

A new report by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says sea levels are rising twice as fast as they used to. They’re also warming up and losing oxygen, meaning climate change will increasingly impact everything from coastal flooding to hurricanes to the number of fish in the sea.

According to the report, about 680 million people (10% of the global population) live in coastal regions less than 30 feet above sea level, and face increasing risks caused by sea level rise, storm intensification, and a host of other issues. Large swaths of coastal Louisiana and the Gulf Coast fall squarely into that category.

To better understand what the report suggests about the future of the Gulf Coast, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with Dr. Lisa Levin, an oceanographer at UC San Diego and one of the authors of the report.

New Orleans students called for action ahead of UN climate talks in New York.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Youth all over the world walked out of school Friday to call for action on climate change, ahead of the United Nations climate talks in New York next week. Students in New Orleans were among those participating in the "Youth Climate Strike."

Gabriele Manoli / ETH Zurich

As the climate warms, cities are thinking about how to mitigate urban temperature increases. But cities in wet climates like South Louisiana may have a tougher time cooling off than those in drier climates, according to a new study published Wednesday in the scientific journal Nature.

BDPC LLC + Pinsonat

A strong majority of Louisiana voters believe in climate change, according to a new poll sponsored by several environmental groups.

About 1,000 “chronic voters” in Louisiana were surveyed by phone for the poll, which was conducted by political consulting firm BDPC LLC + Pinsonat for the Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Hundreds of advocates gathered in New Orleans Tuesday evening to show support for a set of environmental goals aimed at addressing climate change and inequality known as the Green New Deal.

Tuesday’s event was less about specific policy details, and more about prioritizing black and indigenous voices as those policies start to take shape.

This week on The Reading Life: Journalist, novelist, and New Orleanian Nathaniel Rich talks about his new book, “Losing Earth: A Recent History.”

Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week:

Here in New Orleans:

Author Nathaniel Rich on Climate Change, April 4

Mar 19, 2019

Be in the audience on Thursday, April 4, when WWNO’s Coastal Reporter Tegan Wendland interviews author Nathaniel Rich about his new book, Losing Earth: A Recent History.  Rich argues that by 1979 we knew nearly everything we know today about climate change, and how to stop it. In Losing Earth, Rich chronicles the next decade’s desperate campaign by a small number of scientists, politicians, and others to act before we lose the chance to save the earth.

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show Harry bring us Let Me Tell You About the Bees, News of the Warm, It's a Smart World, News of the Godly, World of the Godly, World of Microplastics, Apologies of the Week, and more.

Morley et al., 2018 / Pew Charitable Trusts

A report out this month says that the world’s oceans are warming much faster than expected. That’s already causing some fish species to move north, and could bring more changes to the ocean in the future.

To better understand how this will impact Gulf of Mexico fisheries like shrimp, snapper, and oysters, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with Dr. Rebecca Selden, a Marine Ecologist at Rutgers University.

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