climate change

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show, Harry presents News of the Atom, Harry Reads the Trades, News of the Olympic Movement, News of the Godly, News of the Warm, Apologies of the Week, and more!

Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change, 2019

Climate change will affect today’s children at every stage of their life. That’s one of the takeaways from a new study from the Lancet Countdown, a project of the medical journal The Lancet.

To talk more about the study, and what it means for the Gulf Coast, reporter Travis Lux spoke with Dr. Jeremy Hess. Hess is a professor of emergency medicine, environmental health, and global health at the University of Washington, and is one of the authors of the report.

Tina Freeman

Photographer and New Orleanian Tina Freeman’s exhibition Lamentations, currently at New Orleans Museum of Art through March 15, 2020, has drawn a great deal of attention. Its unique approach- a series of diptychs that juxtaposes marsh against glaciers - has received national press recently, and her work on interiors and landscapes continues to generate acknowledgement everywhere. But the subject of Lamentations - the point that the water that melts off the glaciers has to go somewhere, not unusually, the coastal marshes - reflects Tina’s strongest interest over the last few years. She joined WWNO's Karl Lengel to share her thoughts on that interest.

Travis Lux / WWNO

A network of advocacy organizations across the Gulf South has published regional Green New Deal policy platform that aims to build on the national policy of the same name.

The Green New Deal is a resolution in Congress that outlines several ways the country can address climate change. It emphasizes clean energy jobs, environmental justice, and transitioning away from fossil fuels. It’s a non-binding resolution -- so it would not change any laws, if passed.

For the last six months, advocacy organizations from Texas to Florida have been working on a regional version, called Gulf South for a Green New Deal.

elizabethrush.net

A year ago this month, Karl Lengel sat down with author Elizabeth Rush to discuss her book Rising: Dispatches From the New American Shore, described as "a highly original work of lyric reportage and a haunting meditation on how to let go of the places we love". She chronicled several American communities that have been changed by rising waters, including Staten Island, as affected by Hurricane Sandy and the Isle de Jean Charles in Louisiana. Rising: Dispatches From the New American Shore was named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Have you ever read a story about climate change, and by the end of the article thought, ”Great, now what?” Or maybe, “What do I do with that information? I have questions!”

The Coastal Desk of WWNO and WRKF wants to answer your questions about living with climate change for an upcoming project.

GNOF

As climate change brings more extreme temperatures, bigger storms and heavier rainfall, people of all backgrounds are affected. But research has shown that low-income people and people of color are disproportionately impacted. They often live in low-lying areas that flood more or in urban neighborhoods that become “heat islands." They often fall through the cracks when it comes to government disaster assistance.

On Monday city officials released a new plan to try to address those inequities. It’s a collaboration with the Greater New Orleans Foundation and the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice.

Tegan Wendland talked with Ramsey Green, Deputy CAO of Infrastructure and Chief Resilience Officer for the City of New Orleans, about what the plan entails.

IPCC

A new report by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says sea levels are rising twice as fast as they used to. They’re also warming up and losing oxygen, meaning climate change will increasingly impact everything from coastal flooding to hurricanes to the number of fish in the sea.

According to the report, about 680 million people (10% of the global population) live in coastal regions less than 30 feet above sea level, and face increasing risks caused by sea level rise, storm intensification, and a host of other issues. Large swaths of coastal Louisiana and the Gulf Coast fall squarely into that category.

To better understand what the report suggests about the future of the Gulf Coast, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with Dr. Lisa Levin, an oceanographer at UC San Diego and one of the authors of the report.

New Orleans students called for action ahead of UN climate talks in New York.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Youth all over the world walked out of school Friday to call for action on climate change, ahead of the United Nations climate talks in New York next week. Students in New Orleans were among those participating in the "Youth Climate Strike."

Gabriele Manoli / ETH Zurich

As the climate warms, cities are thinking about how to mitigate urban temperature increases. But cities in wet climates like South Louisiana may have a tougher time cooling off than those in drier climates, according to a new study published Wednesday in the scientific journal Nature.

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