climate change

Times-Picayune | The Advocate

By Tristan Baurick, Times Picayune | The Advocate

TER HEIJDE, The Netherlands — With a surfboard strapped to his feet and the reins of a giant kite in his hands, Daan Vijverberg skimmed over whitecaps on the Netherlands’ windy south coast. Nearby, other kiteboarders caught gusts strong enough to fling their wetsuited bodies several feet into the air.

“It’s addictive,” Vijverberg said, emerging from the water with a red face and the sniffles. “I have to come two, three times a week.”

Chris Granger / Times-Picayune | The Advocate

By Tristan Baurick, Times-Picayune | The Advocate

Up close is not the best way to see the world’s biggest gate.

Standing alongside it from one end, where a three-story hinge links to a massive steel lattice, the Maeslant storm surge barrier resembles three crane towers toppled across one another. From the opposite end, nearly 280 yards away, it’s an imposing white wall, like a drive-in movie screen stretched the length of 2½ football fields.

And that’s only half of it.

Chris Granger / Times-Picayune | The Advocate

After Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana officials sought advice from the Dutch.

It makes sense. In the Netherlands, people have been managing water for a thousand years. Coastal communities across the world are now facing new climate threats — rising seas, more intense storms and heavier rain.

(Chris Granger/Times-Picayune | The Advocate)

After Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana officials sought advice from the Dutch. Which makes sense: in the Netherlands people have been managing water for about a thousand years. Coastal communities across the world are now facing new existential threats — rising seas, more intense storms and heavier rain.

National Phenology Network

Spring is coming earlier, and it is bringing warmer temperatures and earlier blooming trees and flowers. The USA National Phenology Network tracks these factors and has documented an early spring across the southeast. Reporter Tegan Wendland talked with director Theresa Crimmins about so-called “false springs” and the implications for plants and animals.

Pages