climate change

Brett Duke / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: a newish technology called environmental DNA, how sea level rise threatens internet infrastructure, and what we can learn from the alligator amid proposed changes to the Endangered Species Act.

Environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Joan Meiners from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune talk about the week in coastal news.

Enrico Strocchi / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: sharks, the evironmental impact of feral cats, and a new study links temperature and suicide.

WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with Joan Meiners from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune about the week in coastal news.

Travis Lux / WWNO

 

New Orleans is a city that floods. Even a small storm can leave streets impassable. City officials say they’re working on solutions, but they’re also asking citizens to help out.

All this week we’ve aired stories about how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring — heavier rains, bigger storms, extreme temperatures — and there are some serious doubts. That’s why some people are taking matters into their own hands.

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Climate change is bringing more extreme temperatures —- the last decade was the warmest on record. Scientists say that pattern will continue.

In Louisiana, temperatures could increase by 10 degrees by the end of the century. Heat stresses human health and the electric grid. How prepared is New Orleans for the heat?

Will Brown

According to a new report, more than 40,000 Louisiana homes and 99,00 Louisiana residents are at risk of chronic flooding due to rising seas in the next 30 years. In total, 311,000 homes may be at risk across the United States.

 

The report was published by the Union of Concerned Scientists, a climate change advocacy group. Researchers made the calculation by combining sea level rise predictions with data from Zillow, an online real estate company.

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