coast

Brett Duke / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

The Jefferson Parish landfill, and whether it's the source of persistent odors irritating Harahan and River Ridge residents, are the topics of this week's Coastal News Roundup. WWNO's Tegan Wendland talks with reporter Drew Broach of NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune. 

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Tristan Baurick, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

For this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talks with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune reporter Tristan Baurick about a possible shrimpers' strike and a visit to Port Eads, a little-known and remote outpost at the mouth of the Mississippi.

 

New Orleans: Ready Or Not? The Storms Will Come

Jul 12, 2018
Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Improvements to the federal hurricane protection system mean New Orleans is better prepared for storms than ever before. But just outside the levees, coastal land loss continues to be a threat. To address it experts say officials need to come to terms with what it means to be a coastal city.

 

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Climate change is bringing more extreme temperatures —- the last decade was the warmest on record. Scientists say that pattern will continue.

In Louisiana, temperatures could increase by 10 degrees by the end of the century. Heat stresses human health and the electric grid. How prepared is New Orleans for the heat?

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Orleans is vulnerable. Even a small storm can wipe out power for thousands of homes. Scientists say climate change is going to bring more intense storms, heavier rainfall and increased heat. More than a decade after Hurricane Katrina, officials say the city is more protected than ever. But big storms are just one threat. This week, WWNO explores how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring with a special Coastal Desk series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?

Army Corps of Engineers

Ahead of the official start of hurricane season nola.com/The Times-Picayune has released a series on the hurricane protection system built around the city. WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with reporter Mark Schleifstein about what he found.

Chris Granger / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

Another week of freezing temperatures crippled New Orleans infrastructure. But what impact could it have on coastal plants and animals?

Nola.com | The Times-Picayune reporter Sara Sneath spoke with WWNO's Tegan Wendland about the week's coastal news, including a lawsuit filed to seek records related to the controversial Bayou Bridge Pipeline.

Matt Hauer / Nature Climate Change

Rising seas and sinking land are forcing many along Louisiana’s coast to make hard decisions. Stay put, or move inland to safety. But it’s not just a problem here, coastal residents across the nation are facing the same challenges.

A study recently published in the journal Nature Climate Change predicts that millions will move inland in coming years.

WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with Matt Hauer, a demographer at the University of Georgia, about how this will change life in coastal areas - and create new challenges for the communities where those people will move. 

St. John the Baptist Parish

St. John the Baptist is the latest parish to file a lawsuit against oil and gas companies. Parish officials say the industry is partially to blame for coastal land loss.

 

It’s the latest move in a long saga as the suits make their way through various courts.