coastal land loss

Kevin Gautreaux / LPB

We hear a lot about how the Louisiana coast is disappearing. The state has lost about 2,000 square miles of coastal marsh since the 1930s. One of the biggest reasons: subsidence. What is subsidence? Why does it happen and what can we do to stop it?

Molly Keogh / Tulane University

Louisiana’s soil is sinking much faster than previously thought -- that’s the conclusion of a new report out this week from Tulane University.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux speaks with Tulane wetlands geologist Molly Keogh, who authored the report, about what that means for sea level rise predictions in Louisiana.

CPRA

Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) released a draft of its new annual plan at the monthly CPRA Board meeting on Wednesday, Jan.16. At the meeting, officials said they plan to seek permits for a significantly bigger Mid-Breton river diversion.

Travis Lux / WWNO

For all you Grinches out there chomping at the bit to get rid of your Christmas tree, you might want to wait until January. Several local governments will be collecting and recycling trees in the new year to help fight coastal land loss.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: marshes are usually pretty wet, so you might not think they'd burn -- but near Avery Island, land managers are lighting them on fire. Plus, we discuss conflict of interest accusations around one of the state’s big coastal restoration projects.

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks about the week in coastal news with environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune.

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