Education

Edwards and Rispone differ on how they approach K12 ed.
WALLIS WATKINS, WRKF/AURIANNA CORDERO, LSU REVEILLE

One of the most important issues to many voters is education, and there are some key differences in how Democratic incumbent John Bel Edwards and his Republican challenger Eddie Rispone approach K-12 education.

George Washington Carver High School students Kennis Fairley (left), Marneisha Gilmore and Jacorey Warner.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Over the last four weeks, WWNO has brought listeners our series "This Is Why It Matters" - stories about people our community has lost to gun violence.

The Holocaust memorial in Berlin.
CC0 Public Domain

There are a lot of subjects that are tough to teach, but one of the most difficult is the Holocaust. It’s an important historical event, but one that can be scary for students to hear about, and hard to understand. With a recent rise in hate crimes, activists say now especially, the history of the Holocaust and antisemitism is important for students to learn.

Echoes and Reflections creates middle and high school curriculum on the Holocaust. WWNO's education reporter Jess Clark attended their recent training at the National World War II Museum. Here are five ways to improve instruction.

The Nation's report card shows more Louisiana students are performing at proficient, but that the state still trails the rest of the country.
midnightpeace_90 / Flickr

Louisiana public schools maintained their overall 'B' rating, based on the state department of education's system for measuring school quality. The grade comes from a "school performance score" - a state calculation based on standardized test results and graduation rates. The score ticked up slightly from 76.1 in 2018 to 77.1. in 2019.

Jacorey Warner [left] is interviewed by his friend and classmate Marneisha Gilmore about his friend Deshaun Singleton.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Our student-produced series “This Is Why It Matters” is about the people our community has lost to gun violence.

Orleans Parish officials say this is the fourth year of stagnant or declining test scores.
DCJOHN / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Louisiana's class of 2019 had an average composite ACT score of 18.9 - the lowest average score since the state started requiring all students to take the exam in 2013.

The Nation's report card shows more Louisiana students are performing at proficient, but that the state still trails the rest of the country.
midnightpeace_90 / Flickr

The "Nation's Report Card," or the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), shows Louisiana students are performing better in math and reading, but that the state still lags behind the rest of the nation, as well as the rest of the South.

The NAEP is based on nationally representative testing of thousands of 4th and 8th grade students in reading and math. It's carried out by the federal government through the National Center for Education Statistics.

Carver junior Kennis Fairley and drama teacher Ateja Lewis.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Our student-produced series “This Is Why It Matters” is about the lives of people our community has lost to gun violence. One thing students at George Washington Carver High School discovered in their reporting is that students aren’t the only people at school struggling with grief - many Carver teachers are grappling with the emotional toll of having lost students to homicide. Some teachers are also survivors of their own trauma.

Carver junior Marneisha Gilmore with the cut-out of her sister Markeisha Gilmore.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Our student-produced series "This Is Why It Matters" is mostly about the people our community has lost to gun violence. But one of our student producers, George Washington Carver High School junior Marneisha Gilmore, has a story that's a little different.

Marneisha's older sister, Markeisha Gilmore, was 18 years old when she died in an accident in January 2019. Markeisha loved to dance and listen to music. She had graduated from McDonogh 35 Senior High School, and was studying nursing at Louisiana State University.

Shawanda Warren, Natasha Warren, Loghan Greenwood, Tammy Bradley and Kawanda Warren pose with photos of Bug at their home in New Orleans.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

New Orleans has one of the highest murder rates in the country, and research shows more than half of the young people in this city have lost someone to homicide - most often to gun violence. Students at George Washington Carver High School are no exception, and they have stories to tell - not just about the trauma of losing someone - but about the lives of the people they've lost. Together with WWNO education reporter Jess Clark and radio producer Eve Abrams, a group of Carver students produced the series '"This Is Why It Matters" for WWNO.

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