Leah Chase

Dr. John performs at the Link Stryjewski Foundation's Bal Masque in New Orleans in 2017.
Ian McNulty

It’s starting to sink in. The back-to-back deaths of Leah Chase and Dr. John feels like waking up to find that a pair of mountain peaks have vanished from the range of New Orleans culture.

The question now is whether New Orleans can still produce the legends it minted a generation ago. That is the gauntlet these greats lay at our feet.

This week, we mark the passing of New Orleans icon, and our dear friend, Leah Chase, who died Saturday, June 1 at the age of 96. We spend the hour honoring Leah's talent and achievements and the legacy she leaves behind.

Susan Larson sits down with Judy Walker to discuss cookbooks, part two of four.

Louisiana Eats

Join us this week as we celebrate the 95th birthday of a New Orleans icon, our dear friend, Leah Chase. We'll spend the hour honoring Leah's talent and achievements as the undisputed Queen of Creole Cooking.

Coming up in the Quarter: Stories from Leah Chase

Mar 10, 2017
The Historic New Orleans Collection

Before Leah Chase became the culinary luminary of Dooky Chase's Restaurant, she had to start somewhere. Right out of school, Leah took her first restaurant job in a little cafe in the French Quarter. It was during that time that she found her calling as a restaurateur and met some memorable characters along the way. In this edition of NOLA Life Stories, Leah takes us back to her early days working in the Quarter.

President George W. Bush visits the restored Dooky Chase Restaurant in 2008 with Leah Chase, left, and Dooky Chase, right.
Joyce N. Boghosian / The White House

Edgar "Dooky" Chase, Jr., the patriarch of the Chase family who passed away at the end of 2016, helped in making Dooky Chase’s Restaurant the landmark establishment it is today. Here, his wife of 70 years, Chef Leah Chase, shares memories of her husband, his life as a musician and the quiet role he played behind the scenes in the Civil Rights movement.


Poppy Tooker and Leah Chase in the kitchen of Dooky Chase's Restaurant
Joe Shriner

What turns an ordinary woman into a legend? On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we attempt to answer that question by taking an in-depth look at four inspiring women who have conquered life's challenges and become legends in their own time.

Joyce N. Boghosian / The White House

Leah Chase: say the name and New Orleanians know exactly who you’re talking about. She’s a great chef, a civil rights activist, and an avid art collector. And it’s not a stretch to say that – to some people – she’s the maternal figure of the city. On this edition of Nola Life Stories, Leah Chase, in her own words.  

This interview was conducted by Mark Cave for the Historic New Orleans Collection.

Joe Shriner

The food scene of New Orleans has grown tremendously since Hurricane Katrina. On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we complete our two-part series on the storm by taking a look at the changing face of the city's food scene over the past 10 years.

Chris Kehoe

Big news on this week’s Louisiana Eats! We move into our new studios, located in the Southern Food and Beverage Museum on Oretha Castle Haley in Central City.

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