media

Illustration by Jasper Means

When President John F. Kennedy was assassinated on November 22nd, 1963, people around the country quickly rejected their government's conclusion that a sole assassin committed the crime. A slew of conspiracy theories took hold, but only one conspiracy theorist transferred his theories into actual arrests. Jim Garrison, District Attorney of New Orleans, was media savvy, and skillfully attracted TV cameras, reporters, and supporters with his giant claims. In 1967, the world watched Garrison insist that he had “solved the assassination.” But who was at fault?

Illustration by Jasper Means

 

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Huey Pierce Long: you either loved him, or hated him. He had thousands of adoring fans, and fearful enemies. Long went from traveling salesman to Louisiana Governor, and then US senator, through his mastery of the media. Then once in power, he waged a war against it.

Sticky Wicket: Louisiana Politics Versus the Press is a new mini series out of WWNO New Orleans Public Radio and WRKF Baton Rouge Public Radio that takes on four historic clashes between Louisiana politicians and the media, one at a time. These relationships have always been love/hate in the Pelican state.

Click on the player above to hear the trailer, and tune in Tuesday, November 13th at 630 p.m. to hear the first episode live on WWNO. 

WWNO

Make any attempt to quickly describe James Arey, and you’re bound to leave something out. James is an artist, teacher, composer, five-time Jeopardy! champion, and one-time mayoral candidate. NolaVie’s Joe Shriner spoke with James about his most recent role, as returning Classical Music Host on Classical 104.9 FM.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Joe Shriner.

Classical 104.9 FM hosts James Arey (left) and Jack Hopke.
Kenneth Lass / WWNO

WWNO 89.9 FM New Orleans Public Radio has begun broadcasting classical music on a new radio station, Classical 104.9 FM. With the launch of this twenty-four-hour all-classical station, New Orleans becomes the only Gulf Coast community between Houston and Tallahassee where music-lovers can hear classical music on FM radio anytime throughout the year. Classical 104.9’s signal is expected to reach standard FM radios throughout New Orleans, the Eastbank suburbs, and the major Westbank communities.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 13, 2016

89.9 WWNO -- New Orleans Public Radio reporter Ryan Kailath has been released from jail following his arrest Saturday, July 9, in Baton Rouge on one count of Simple Obstruction of a Highway of Commerce. Kailath was providing continuing coverage of the protests that erupted in Louisiana’s capital city after the shooting death of Alton Sterling by Baton Rouge police.

Jesse Hardman

WWNO's Ryan Kailath was arrested Saturday while covering a protest near Baton Rouge police headquarters. The event drew members of the New Black Panther Party. Police in riot gear engaged in a standoff with the group, during which Kailath was one of many arrested and charged with simple obstruction of a highway. WWNO's Eve Troeh spoke with him about what happened.

Paul Maassen and Nick Spitzer.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If somebody walks up to you on Bourbon Street and says “I bet I know where you got them shoes,” you’ve got a pretty good idea of how he’s making a living. There's a phrase you hear even more often. It’s, “Brought to you by.” As in, “Today’s show is brought to you by…”

Like the “shoes on Bourbon Street”, “brought to you by” is a phrase about revenue. You hear it on public radio. Including this show. But do you know what it means? Do you know the difference between public and commercial radio?

 A Tobacco Card from 1887
Joseph Makkos / NOLA DNA

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a profile of Eliza Jane Nicholson, a small town poet who became the first woman publisher of a major metropolitan newspaper.


French Quarter Festival Executive Director Marci Schramm.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

When we talk about big events in New Orleans we typically say “Mardi Gras and Jazz Fest.”

Economically, though, if we’re going to bracket two events, we should say “Mardi Gras and French Quarter Festival.” French Quarter Festival’s economic impact on the city has become massive. It’s reportedly bigger than Jazz Fest.

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