mid-city

Karl Lengel

There are a lot of ways to pass this coming holiday weekend - the traditional American salute to the millions who worked and toiled for a better life and a better country. Grilling meat is popular - wrapping up the summer season. The juncture of the end of summer, our proximity to a serious food culture, and a butcher in Mid-City that got the attention of Food & Wine made for a tasty pursuit. If you happen to be looking for a piece of meat, we’ve got just the place for you.

Kelley Crawford

Some of New Orleans’ most prized treasures are tucked away in residential neighborhoods. Take Rosalie Apothecary, which is located on a quiet corner in Faubourg Saint John. Rosalie prides itself on being a community resource and home for those who want to learn more about herbs and natural remedies. NolaVie's Kelley Crawford sat down with shop owner Christiane Wurmstedt to find out what it's like to run a modern-day apothecary.

J. Regan / Flickr

Sean Kennedy has been known as the Irishman and patron of Finn McCool’s, and he’s now known as the Irishman and new owner of Finn McCool’s. After years of working tirelessly and building a tight community in their Mid-City pub, Stephen and Pauline Patterson have passed the torch on to Sean, who’s more than up to the challenge. Especially if there’s soccer involved.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.  

Restaurants near the Lafitte Greenway are seeing a different kind of customer since the bike path opened. Po-boy purveyor Parkway Tavern & Bakery is one of them.
Ian McNulty

Look around the streets of New Orleans these days and it's impossible to miss that more people are traversing the city on bicycles.

Some restaurants and bars are noticing too, and nowhere more than a part of Mid-City that's becoming a crossroads of bike paths, a destination for in-town outings and, on nice days, a hub for people making the rounds by pedal power.

The menu at Lahpet, a pop-up in Mid-City, is full of flavors from Burmese cooking.
Ian McNulty

A salad for lunch can be light and it can feel refreshing. Rarely does the dish actually deliver its own buzz. But that is one of the attributes of a salad called lahpet. It’s built around fermented tea leaves, which lend the kick behind the beguiling pungency of the dish.

The University of New Orleans is holding its annual Economic Outlook summit today, with Latter and Blum Realtors. This year’s review will focus on how one project in New Orleans is affecting the regional economy.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

The enterprising neighbors and opportune eats in the colorful neighborhood around the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival make for an appetizing scene before or after the show.

Everyone knows you should be ready to eat during a day at Jazz Fest. But no one says you have to show up starving. And on the way back out, I’ve found it’s a good idea to have a little room in the tank too, to be ready for opportune eats.

Ian McNulty

Restaurants and bars have been pioneers for reinvesting in areas across New Orleans. Local dining writer Ian McNulty says the next example is taking shape along Tulane Avenue.

It takes a lot more than restaurants and bars to get an economic revitalization going and turn the corner. But still, when you’re first kicking the wheels into motion, new places to eat and drink are not bad places to start, especially when you’re talking about redevelopment in New Orleans.

Kate Richardson / WWNO

A new Whole Foods store opened in Mid-City on Tuesday, at Broad and Bienville. It’s the site of the former Schwegmann’s grocery, which has been vacant ever since Katrina.

The space includes four nonprofit tenants in addition to the Whole Foods. The upscale grocery is just one of many factors reshaping the area.

Ten days before the grand opening of the new Whole Foods, the meeting room at the Sojourner Truth community center was buzzing in anticipation.

Pages