music

Big Freedia, the Queen Diva of Bounce, has done more than any other artist to bring the unmistakable New Orleans hip-hop sound to the world. His output is as unrelenting as the bounce beat, with singles, EPs, videos, all-star collaborations, LGBTQ rights advocacy, and a reality television show now entering its sixth season.

On this Continuum you'll hear a special program of early Christmas music performed by the New Orleans Musica da Camera. This is music from their CD, Natus Est, directed by Continuum hosts Milton Scheuermann and Thais St. Julien.

Xavier Badosa / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

People love talking about the weather. And we did a lot of talking during this year's busy hurricane season. Turns out the weather has a way of showing up in music — but less now than it used to.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux talked with Paul Williams, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading in the UK, who studies how musicians write about the weather. He hopes climate change will inspire more weather-related music.

 

This week, we bring you that funky gentleman from the Ninth Ward, Jon Cleary, who talks about his native England, his grandmother, the piano back home, his mum’s songwriting chops, and a variety of other loves.

Cleary grew up listening to New Orleans soul, r&b and funk. And now, we listen to him.

As a multi-instrumentalist and sideman, he’s played with some of the best artists, including Earl King, Bonnie Raitt, Dr. John, Snooks Eaglin, Ernie K-Doe and Walter “Wolfman” Washington. But Cleary is even better fronting his own band and digging into his own groove.

This week, Continuum presents a program of medieval Christmas music, most of which is unknown to modern day listeners. Beginning with Aquitanian selections of the 12th century, the program progresses through the Italian, Spanish and German repertoire, ending with a selection of 15th century English carols.

Within Buddhist traditions, “samsara” refers to the karmic cycle of rebirth that a being must travel through on their journey towards enlightenment. While in some traditions this can take many lifetimes to complete, others maintain that, for certain exceptional people, the transformative process can happen within a single lifetime.

 

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with Tulane University professor Joel Dinerstein, whose new study of cool -- "The Origins of Cool in Postwar America" -- goes back to its start. Chris Champagne, author of Secret New Orleans, a guide to some wonderful and unexpected sights, describes his travels around the city.

English singer, lutenist, guitarist and composer Martin Best is the subject of this Continuum program. He has been active in early music since the mid 1970s with special emphasis on Renaissance music and minstrel songs of the French troubadours and trouveres.

Great artists and producers make our show happen, and in this episode we’re hearing from some of the the folks who typically don’t step in front of the microphone. We’re celebrating the end of another successful year by revisiting our favorite live performances, as remembered by Music Inside Out’s producers and friends of the show.

It’s About People Coming Together Over Barriers

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