music business

Over the years, guests of Music Inside Out have described any number of approaches to making a living in music. Some have had greater commercial success than others. They’ve hit the top of the record charts and toured the world. Of course, commercial appeal is only one measure of a musician’s contribution to the art form. Talent, musicality, creativity and imprint on culture cannot be discounted. And yet, artists need the approbation that only a steady income can bring.

Guillaume Laurent / Flickr

With the 56th GRAMMY Awards this weekend, it's time to consider the business of music. Artist royalties, mechanical royalties, revenue streams and recording contracts have been the bread-and-butter of Scott Aiges.

Guillaume Laurent / Flickr

Artist royalties, mechanical royalties, revenue streams and recording contracts have been the bread-and-butter of Scott Aiges.

He's managed musicians (Astral Project, The Continental Drifters, and Royal Fingerbowl to name just three) through the years and he teaches the business of music at Tulane. For awhile he was a music critic at The Times-Picayune. And he's even worked in the halls of power, serving as the director of music business development for the City of New Orleans. 

He knows the business.