NolaVie

Lucky Art Fair / NolaVie

In a city so culturally invested in creativity, New Orleans artists are often faced with a lack of financial investment in their creations. That was part of the impetus behind the Lucky Art Fair, a showcase for underrepresented artists that made its debut earlier this year. NolaVie’s David Benedetto invited co-founders Rosalie Smith and Regina Parkinson into the studio to hear about the project.

Kerry Myers

The road to Angola, the Louisiana State Penitentiary, is long and isolated. It sets the plantation-turned-prison back from lush and hilly West Feliciana Parish, an otherwise picturesque corner of the state.

Christopher Nobles

The slow food movement pervades New Orleans restaurants and markets, and one of the latest local purveyors of this kind is Piety & Desire Chocolate, a bean to bar chocolate maker that has found a home on South Broad Street. NolaVie’s David Benedetto invited founder Christopher Nobles into the studio to hear more about his slow food-inspired confectionery. 

Kelley Crawford

As part of the grand opening of their new exhibition center, the Historic New Orleans Collection is hosting a series of informal gallery talks called “Stoop Stories.” NolaVie’s Kelley Crawford joins artist James Michalopoulos on the stoop to talk about his expressionistic New Orleans-centered artwork.

Brennan's New Orleans

The Peabody Hotel in Memphis may have its ducks, but Brennan’s in New Orleans can match the attraction.  The French Quarter restaurant has its own resident family of turtles. Since the spring of 2015, 10 of them have inhabited the fountain pool in the French Quarter restaurant’s lush courtyard. NolaVie’s Renée Peck spoke with Brennan’s General Manager Christian Pendleton about the resident turtles, and the annual parade that honors them – surely the slowest second line on Earth.

New Orleans Summer And Other Harsh Truths

Sep 1, 2016


When I left New Orleans as a young adult to pursue an education and later a career in other parts of America, I quickly realized that simply being from the 504 carried with it a certain exotic quality. “Wait,” new acquaintances would say, “you’re actually from New Orleans? I never thought that someone could, you know...grow up there…”

About 200 people gathered at The Pavilion of the Two Sisters in City Park on Sunday for a memorial to cultural activist Sharon Litwin. 

  Leaders of the groups she helped over the years turned out to honor the British native who embraced New Orleans.

Anila Keswani
Anila Keswani / Nolavie

New Orleans’ roots are diverse. This summer, Nolavie is speaking with members of different communities that have woven their unique strands into the local culture. Today, Renee Peck speaks with restaurant owner Anila Keswani about her life in the Crescent City and her relationship to its Indian-American community.

You are about to enter another dimension. Not just one of sight and sound, but of mind. It is a dimension of costumed revelry and sugared cakes with plastic babies, of fanatics dressed in black and gold and sandwiches dressed with “mynez” and Crystal. A dimension of wild celebration of the human condition, a place where everyone is “dawlin” and no one is without a cold drink. 

There is a signpost up ahead. You are about to enter...The New Orleans Zone.

Angel Trumpets release some of the best smells in the city.
Scott Gold / Nolavie

When people fall in love with New Orleans -- a phenomenon that happens on a daily basis around here -- they’re wont to wax poetically about the familiar qualities that make this city such a special and enchanting place.

But all of this gushing tends to leave out a single and singular fact of life in the Crescent City: This town, for lack of a better word, smells.

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