NOPD

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

New Orleans Police Superintendent Shaun Ferguson delivered an optimistic assessment Wednesday of the department he’s led since mid-January.  

Commander Shaun Ferguson has been chosen as New Orleans' next police chief.
City of New Orleans

New Orleans mayor LaToya Cantrell has tapped NOPD commander Shaun Ferguson to become the city’s next chief of police.

Illustration by Jasper Means

In 1979, Ernest "Dutch" Morial became the first black mayor of New Orleans. He won the election with 95% of the black vote, and just 20% of the white vote. He campaigned on a platform of police reform, but it wasn’t just Dutch who wanted to re-organize the NOPD – they were organizing themselves. They wanted a union, pay increases, and better working conditions. Soon after Dutch took office, the police wasted no time. They staged their first strike, in history. Their bargaining tool? Mardi Gras.

A resident satirizes New Orleans' contentious surveillance system.
Natalie Yahr / The Listening Post

New Orleans's $40 million public safety plan means as many as 1,500 security cameras are going up around the city, potentially making it one of the most surveilled places in the country. The cameras send live footage to the Real Time Crime Monitoring Center, where NOPD monitors feeds around the clock.  

Hundreds of strip club workers and their supporters marched through the French Quarter Thursday, protesting police raids that have left them out of work.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Hundreds of strip club workers and their supporters marched through the French Quarter Thursday night, protesting police raids on clubs that have left them out of work. 

A poster in offices of the NOPD's 1st District Headquaters.
Thomas Walsh / The Listening Post

A member of the New Orleans community recently told us about a time she tried to be a good samaritan and wound up arrested by NOPD. This inspired The Listening Post to look at community policing in New Orleans. We asked:

1) What strategies do you think community policing should include?

2) If you could sit down for coffee with the police, what would you ask?

3) What could the NOPD specifically do to imporve its relationship with your community?

This week on All Things New Orleans, NOPD Superintendent Michael Harrison shares details about the city's new false alarm ordinance which goes into effect on May 1, 2017.

Then, we look back seven years ago to the damage caused by the BP Oil Disaster and share a story from coastal scientist Estelle Robichaux.

This week on All Things New Orleans we'll speak with Xavier University of Louisiana's Keller Endowed Chair in the Humanities and professor of African American Music, Dr. Michael White. He'll share information about the upcoming Culture of New Orleans Series, "The Sacred and the Sinful: Hymns and Blues in New Orleans Jazz," coming up Sunday, March 12, at 2pm in the University Center McCaffrey Ballroom.

Landrieu at Congress of Day Laborers Meeting
Nina Feldman

Last night, Mayor Mitch Landrieu attended the weekly meeting hosted by the Congress of Day Laborers, a group that advocates for immigrant rights. Among the executive orders Donald Trump signed last week, one called  for more federal immigration officers and widened the scope of who they could deport. It also encouraged local law enforcement to work closely with ICE agents. Landrieu assured the assembly that the city will continue to leave deportation to federal officials, and not involve local police.

The New Orleans Inspector General has released a four-year plan for overseeing several city agencies. 

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