oil dispersants

Nadje Najar / Audubon Louisiana

The chemicals used to clean up the BP oil spill may not have been as bad as previous studies suggest -- that’s one of a few themes from the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science (GOMOSES) Conference this week.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux talks with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune environment reporter Tristan Baurick about the latest in oil spill science.

Plus, Tristan tells us about his search for the elusive black rail -- a threatened bird that’s found a home in the precarious marshes of coastal Louisiana.

Deepwater Horizon Response/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

The chemicals used to help clean up the BP oil spill, known as dispersants, have been already been accused of damaging the health of humans and sea life. Now, a new study says they were ineffective at doing what they were meant to do: clean up the oil.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO's Travis Lux speak with Nola.com/The Times-Picayune's Tristan Baurick about the study. Plus, a look at the black rail -- a coastal bird threatened by sea level rise.

Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser is upset that the parish wasn't notified before an apparent drill for pilots who spray oil spills dispersants. And he doesn't believe that the planes used in the drill were spraying only water, as he was told.

Parish official P.J. Hahn says fishermen called him June 13, saying low-flying planes sprayed something that turned to foam on the water and made their skin itch or burn.

Hahn says the Coast Guard told him it was a drill by the oil industry's Marine Spill Response Corp and that only water was being sprayed.