oil spill

U.S. Coast Guard/Getty Images

Saturday is the nine-year anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Today, we take a look at how offshore drilling safety has changed since then, and what the government has done to prevent disasters in the future.

For this week’s coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Tegan Wendland gets the answers from Loyola law professor, Rob Verchick.

Tech. Sgt. Adrian Cadiz / U.S. Air Force

During the BP oil spill in 2010, responders used chemical dispersants to break up the oil. Recent studies have questioned both the safety and efficacy of those chemicals. Other studies have suggested that those concerns are overblown.

So which is it? Are dispersants dangerous? Or are they not? And why is it so hard to figure out?

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times Picayune, sorts it all out with WWNO’s Travis Lux.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: officials investigate who or what might have been behind all the dead pelicans in Plaquemines and St. Bernard Parishes. Plus, an update on the Taylor Energy oil well that’s been leaking in the Gulf of Mexico for almost 15 years.

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks with environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune about the week in coastal news.

Gerald Herbert / AP

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: details on another big climate report, and the Coast Guard orders a stop to the longest-running oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico’s history. Plus, the latest on a legal fight between a Louisiana landowner and an endangered frog.

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks about the week in coastal news with environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune.

Coastal News Roundup: Oil Spill Edition

Apr 20, 2018
SkyTruth / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

It was eight years ago today that the Deepwater Horizon oil rig blew up, spewing more than 160 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over several months.

Anjali Fernandes

This week on the roundup: a new study out of Tulane finds the Mississippi River can’t keep up with coastal land loss, an oil spill shuts down the river, and Hurricane names are retired.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux and Nola.com/The Times Picayune’s Sara Sneath talk about the week in coastal news.

Debris lines the streets of Denham Springs, Louisiana after severe flooding
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Tallying the fallout of the recent flooding in South Louisiana may take weeks or months. Beyond property damage to homes and businesses, there are also environmental costs—which some watchdog groups are measuring on their own.

 

 


Pink, oily sludge passed beneath a bridge over. the 17th Street Canal on Tuesday.
John Lopez / Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation

Local, state and national agencies are responding to an oil-related incident in Jefferson Parish over the weekend.

Pink sludge was found in the 17th Street Canal and it’s not yet public knowledge how it got there.

The Coast Guard is overseeing the cleanup, which is ongoing. It says 900 gallons of waste lubricant came from Delta Petroleum. The company’s website says it blends and packs lubricants and oils.

A company spokesman says it notified state police, the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality and the East Jefferson Levee District on Sunday.

U.S. Coast Guard

The National Science Foundation will spend nearly half a million dollars to help a University of New Orleans chemistry professor study sunlight and oil spills. WWNO reporter Tegan Wendland had a conversation with UNO chemistry professor Matthew Tarr.

Tarr wants to better understand how the sun breaks down oil on the water’s surface.

Maritime traffic along the Mississippi River in Louisiana is getting back to normal after three ships collided about 60 miles west of New Orleans. The Coast Guard is escorting ships between New Orleans and Baton Rouge.

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