oysters

Ian McNulty

I would like to address a false rumor circulating in the news. Multiple sources are claiming that summer is almost over. For evidence, they present back-to-school stories and ads full of men’s sweaters and ladies’ boots. They even track the countdown to Labor Day weekend, as if that settles it.

But in Louisiana we know better.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Louisiana’s Department of Health is shutting down several oyster harvesting areas due to low salinity caused by a steady influx of freshwater from the Bonnet Carre Spillway. 

The spillway, which diverts flood water from the Mississippi River into Lake Pontchartrain, has been open for more than 95 days this year. That’s kept a steady stream of fresh water flowing into areas where oysters grow.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The commercial fishing industry on the Gulf Coast has seen two major disasters in the last 15 years: Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill. Now, some fear we’re on the cusp of a third. The culprit: historic flooding from the Mississippi River.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Mississippi River has been at flood stage for months. Levees and spillways keep most homes and businesses safe and dry from the flood waters, but the high water still creates headaches for levee districts and industries like oil and gas, and fisheries.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO coastal reporter Travis Lux went to find out how the river creates problems we can’t always see. WWNO’s Tegan Wendland got the details.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Environmental issues were big news in 2018 -  locally, nationally, and globally. World leaders from 195 countries gathered in Poland to discuss how to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. A major federal climate report said the U.S. is already feeling the effects of climate change - in the shape of deadly wildfires, devastating hurricanes, and record temperatures.

Travis Lux / WWNO

A former North Dakota lawmaker recently died after eating at a New Orleans restaurant. The alleged culprit: a bacterial infection from a raw oyster. Oysters have long been a trademark of southern cuisine, but they also pose health risks for some. So, just how dangerous is it to eat raw oysters?

Pat Fahey is the co-founder of AmeriPure.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

One of our favorite foods here in Louisiana is raw oysters. Oysters are also the favorite place to hang out for a couple of bacteria that are very unfriendly to human beings. Notwithstanding, nobody in Louisiana has gotten sick from a raw oyster in some time. The reason for that is a company called AmeriPure. AmeriPure kills the bad bacteria in oysters without affecting the oyster’s taste. Pat Fahey is the co-founder of AmeriPure.

Deyan Georgiev / Shutterstock.com

True oyster lust does not stop -- not when you're full but there are still a few oysters on the tray and not in summer, despite that old adage you may have heard concerning months spelled without the “R.” The romance of the oyster cannot be so primly constrained.            

Still, though, as winter arrives  and as our Gulf oysters inch closer to their seasonal prime, the anticipation gets keener and the pleasure of oysters grows sharper. If you’re the sort of oyster eater whose interest perks up as the weather cools down, it's time to catch up on some changes around New Orleans since last season.

Host Poppy Tooker and 2016 Oyster Shucking Champion Jay Gallet
Reggie Morris

On this week’s show, we set out to prove that oysters can — and should — be enjoyed year-round. We’re going behind the scenes to get a better understanding of how those salty bivalves go from farm to table. 

 

Off bottom cultivation is bringing a different flavor to Gulf oysters.
Ian McNulty

Oysters make people happy. That’s a simple truth that resonates deep, and goes beyond satisfying an appetite or even a craving. It’s something as visceral as the raw oyster itself, bursting with the essence of the tides. It can instill a sense of well being bordering on euphoria.

In New Orleans today there are many more ways to chase this bliss. As the number of eateries serving oysters has increased, so have the variety of oyster bar types in which to partake, depending on your style, your mood or your budget.

Pages