Revenue Estimating Conference

Today, we're taking a look back at the year in Louisiana politics.

In 2019, we saw some things change and others stay the same.

Democrat John Bel Edwards earned another four years in the governor's mansion, but it was a lonely victory. Republicans won every other statewide race and have unprecedented control in the House and Senate.

And there were some changes on this program as well. Wallis Watkins has left Capitol Access, but she was kind enough to come back and talk through some of the big stories of 2019.

For the second straight year, Republican lawmakers have refused to accept state economists’ forecast of expected revenue in the upcoming fiscal year, a crucial benchmark for crafting the state budget.

The partisan stand-off over the budget could also delay funding for several projects in Louisiana, including the reopening of the Algiers Ferry, coastal restoration in Plaquemines Parish and payments associated with the Harrah’s Casino contract.

In Thursday’s meeting, Representative Cameron Henry (R-Metairie), on behalf of House Speaker Taylor Barras (R-New Iberia), voted down updated forecasts presented by the Legislative Fiscal Office and pision of Administration.

Speaker of the House Taylor Barras (R-New Iberia) agreed Wednesday to approve $119 million dollars in additional state revenue for next fiscal year, ending a significant stalemate between Governor John Bel Edwards and Republican leaders in the House. 

Governor John Bel Edwards’ administration  presented a $31 billion proposal for next year’s budget on Friday. But before it can become a reality, a legislative stalemate would have to break. 

For the second time in as many weeks, Republican leaders in the House have rejected guidance from state economists who estimate Louisiana’s income will be higher than expected this fiscal year and next. 

Insight: An Almost Balanced Budget Mid-Year

Jan 17, 2014

The Revenue Estimating Conference, which crunches the numbers on the state’s income every year, announced on Wednesday that revenues are $35 million short of what was expected for 2013-2014. But for the first time since Gov. Bobby Jindal took office, there should be no mid-year cuts to Louisiana's budget.