school vouchers

Resurrection of Our Lord school in New Orleans East has 94 percent voucher students.
Fox 8 WVUE

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards is pledging to make changes to the state’s school voucher program after a WWNO joint investigation found most students in the program end up in low-performing private schools.

Employees of McMillian's First Steps Preschool protested the loss of federal funds on Friday, May 17.
Fox 8 News, WVUE

A joint investigation between WWNO, Fox 8 News, WVUE and NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune on the state’s school voucher program found evidence one New Orleans school may have been cheating on state tests. Now the school says federal funds are being pulled from its pre-K program. 

Q&A: Why Louisiana's Voucher Program Isn't Working

May 9, 2019
The application to become a voucher school is just 16 pages long. Meanwhile charter school applications take months, and can run more than 170 pages.
NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune

The Louisiana Scholarship Program, also known as the state’s school voucher program, promises families a way out of struggling public schools. But a joint-investigation with WWNO, Fox 8 News and NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune, reveals the program steered families into private schools with low test scores and little oversight. Our investigation, The Cost of Choice, was part of a collaboration organized by the investigative newsroom, Reveal.

Resurrection of Our Lord school in New Orleans East has 94 percent voucher students.
Fox 8 WVUE

Politicians promised the Louisiana Scholarship Program would offer low-income students a way out of bad public schools. Instead, the program steered families into low-performing private schools with little oversight. 

Orleans Parish officials say this is the fourth year of stagnant or declining test scores.
DCJOHN / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Participating in the state’s school voucher program leads to worse performance on state tests in math, according to the latest study on the Louisiana Scholarship Program.

School Voucher Application Process Begins

Jan 14, 2015

Applications are now being accepted from parents who wants to send their children to private school next year through Louisiana's taxpayer-funded voucher program.

The state education department says applications for the 2015-16 school year are due February 27. They're available at participating schools or online.

Next year, 129 schools are participating in the voucher program. Only 91 will accept new students.

In 2012, when Louisiana’s taxpayer funded scholarship program was expanded statewide, Hosanna Christian Academy in Baton Rouge went all in.

In that first year, the school took on almost 300 voucher students, nearly doubling its enrollment. By the start of this school year, Hosanna had more voucher students than any other school in the state -- about 85 percent of its student are enrolled with a voucher. 

Hosanna's students didn't score well enough on state tests, and it won't be allowed to enroll more voucher students next year. Still, headmaster Josh LaSage says the school isn't giving up. 


The price tag for defending Gov. Bobby Jindal's education policies against legal challenges is growing.

The Department of Education is boosting its contracts for outside lawyers by $750,000, to represent the department in lawsuits against Jindal's voucher program that uses tax dollars to send children to private schools.

A majority of members of the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education agreed Tuesday to the legal spending.

The Justice Department is suing Louisiana for issuing school vouchers to students in districts under desegregation orders. The federal government says the system is undermining racial balances in public schools.

Push for School Vouchers is Tactical

Jul 11, 2013

Louisiana lawmakers went out of their way to add a $46 million line item to the state budget to allow more students from under-performing public schools go to private school through the voucher program championed by Gov. Bobby Jindal

Both Wisconsin and Ohio have just pushed through major expansions of their voucher programs too. And both states -- like Louisiana -- are headed by Republican governors.

Sarah Carr, a writer for the Hechinger Report, says these governors are being strategic in their support of vouchers.

"It’s a way for them to make a name for themselves pursuing an education agenda that’s typically been embraced by conservatives and trying even to some extent to one-up each other in creating a bigger and bolder voucher program."

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