sea level rise

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

A new study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says the federal government should spend $3.2 billion to maintain the levee system around New Orleans over the next 50 years. The study recommends raising the levees and upgrading the flood protection systems in order to match the rising sea levels and sinking land.

In the Lower Ninth Ward, news of future flood risks puts residents on high alert.

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Have you ever read a story about climate change, and by the end of the article thought, ”Great, now what?” Or maybe, “What do I do with that information? I have questions!”

The Coastal Desk of WWNO and WRKF wants to answer your questions about living with climate change for an upcoming project.

IPCC

A new report by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says sea levels are rising twice as fast as they used to. They’re also warming up and losing oxygen, meaning climate change will increasingly impact everything from coastal flooding to hurricanes to the number of fish in the sea.

According to the report, about 680 million people (10% of the global population) live in coastal regions less than 30 feet above sea level, and face increasing risks caused by sea level rise, storm intensification, and a host of other issues. Large swaths of coastal Louisiana and the Gulf Coast fall squarely into that category.

To better understand what the report suggests about the future of the Gulf Coast, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with Dr. Lisa Levin, an oceanographer at UC San Diego and one of the authors of the report.

Molly Keogh / Tulane University

Louisiana’s soil is sinking much faster than previously thought -- that’s the conclusion of a new report out this week from Tulane University.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux speaks with Tulane wetlands geologist Molly Keogh, who authored the report, about what that means for sea level rise predictions in Louisiana.

2018 In Review: Coastal News

Dec 27, 2018
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Environmental issues were big news in 2018 -  locally, nationally, and globally. World leaders from 195 countries gathered in Poland to discuss how to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. A major federal climate report said the U.S. is already feeling the effects of climate change - in the shape of deadly wildfires, devastating hurricanes, and record temperatures.

Deepwater Horizon Response/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

The chemicals used to help clean up the BP oil spill, known as dispersants, have been already been accused of damaging the health of humans and sea life. Now, a new study says they were ineffective at doing what they were meant to do: clean up the oil.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO's Travis Lux speak with Nola.com/The Times-Picayune's Tristan Baurick about the study. Plus, a look at the black rail -- a coastal bird threatened by sea level rise.

New Orleans Aviation Board

The new Louis Armstrong airport is set to open next year. The $1 billion facility is big, sleek - and only four feet above sea level.

Reporter Jennifer Larino has been covering the new airport for Nola.com/The Times Picayune, and she talked with WWNO’s Tegan Wendland about how prepared it is for the threats of climate change. 

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, the Foundation for Louisiana, and local listeners.  

Brett Duke / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: a newish technology called environmental DNA, how sea level rise threatens internet infrastructure, and what we can learn from the alligator amid proposed changes to the Endangered Species Act.

Environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Joan Meiners from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune talk about the week in coastal news.

U.S. Drought Monitor

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: Texas wants to buy Louisiana’s water, coastal cities face credit downgrades, and new research on how when ice sheets melt, sea levels rise unevenly across the globe.

Lauren Sullivan / Flicker/CC BY-SA 2.0

A new study shows Louisiana’s land loss has slowed down a little bit. But that’s still not necessarily good news.

 

It’s almost become a tired refrain here in Louisiana -- the state loses an average of about a football field of land every hour. Now it takes about 100 minutes, roughly an hour and a half for that much land to wash into the Gulf of Mexico.

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