short-term rentals

The Lens

The city of New Orleans has hired Peter Bowen, the former general manager of major short-term rental operator Sonder, as the city’s new deputy chief administrative officer of land use. In his new position, Bowen will manage and oversee major departments including the Department of Code Enforcement and the Department of Safety and Permits, whose long list of responsibilities includes short-term rental permitting and enforcement.

Jay Sterling Austin / Flickr

It’s not an idea that’s new. For centuries, New Orleanians have been taking in lodgers. But technology and a changing culture have transformed the way house rentals work. Airbnb and other sites are making short-term rental options not only easier, but also vastly more widespread. NolaVie’s Renée Peck spoke with attorney Andrew Legrand about the short-term rental ordinance recently passed by the New Orleans City Council, and what it means for locals.  

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The New Orleans City Council is preparing for a long and emotional debate October 20  on how to deal with short-term rentals. An ordinance is on the table that’s designed to regulate the industry that many credit for letting them make enough money to stay in their homes. Others argue that an abundance of visitors staying in neighborhoods throughout the city is ruining their quality of life.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Love them or hate them, short-term rentals are booming in New Orleans. On October, the City Council is expected to make its first vote on regulating short-term rentals. It’s considering rules proposed by the City Planning Commission.  One of the biggest points of contention is whole-house rentals. Many locals say that when short-term visitors rent whole homes, it changes neighborhoods.

As New Orleans continues debating the pros and cons of short-term rentals, an association with members now operating in the burgeoning industry wants to get their message out. Operators of short-term rentals say they want to help – not hurt – the city.