slavery

This week on The Reading Life:  Susan talks with Steve Luxenberg, author of "Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson and America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation."

Susan Larson continues her look at 300 great New Orleans books. Today: African-American culture and tradition with independent scholar Freddi Evans.

Slavery and Freedom, War and Reconstruction

  • Slavery’s Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans During the Age of Revolutionsby Rashauna Johnson
  • Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market, by Walter Johnson
  • Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery, by Adam Rothman
  • New Orleans After the Civil War: Race Politics and a New Birth of Freedom, by Justin Nystrom
  • Uncivil Wars: Five New Orleans Street Battles and the Fall of Radical Reconstructionby James Hogue
  • An Absolute Massacre: The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866, by James Hollandsworth

Afro-Creoles

  • Creole New Orleans: Race and Americanization, edited by Arnold M. Hirsch and Joseph Logsdon
  • Revolution, Romanticism, and the Afro-Creole Protest Tradition in New Orleansby Caryn Bell
  • Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation, by Rebecca Scott and Jean Hebrard
  • Raising Freedom’s Child: Black Children and Visions of the Future After Slavery, by Mary Niall Mitchell
  • Exiles at Home: The Struggle to Become American in Creole New Orleans, by Shirley Elizabeth Thompson

  •   The Strange History of the American Quadroon: Free Women of Color in the Revolutionary Atlantic World, by Emily Clark
  • End of an Era, New Orleans, 1850-1861by Robert Reinders
  • The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisisby Jessica Lepler
  • The Merchants’ Capital: New Orleans and the Political Economy of the 19th Century Southby Scott Marler
  •  Notorious Woman: The Celebrated Case of Myra Clark Gainesby Elizabeth Alexander
  • Judah P. Benjaminby Eli Evans
  • Cities of the Deadby Joseph Roach
  • American Indians in Early New Orleansby Daniel Usner
  • Slavery and Freedom, War and Reconstruction
  • Slavery’s Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans During the Age of Revolutionsby Rashauna Johnson
  • Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market, by Walter Johnson
  • Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery, by Adam Rothman
  • New Orleans After the Civil War: Race Politics and a New Birth of Freedom, by Justin Nystrom
  • Uncivil Wars: Five New Orleans Street Battles and the Fall of Radical Reconstructionby James Hogue
  • An Absolute Massacre: The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866, by James Hollandsworth

 

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns to hunt down a rare artifact full of private, and personal information. Laine Kaplan-Levenson goes on the search.

When you first walk into a hospital, before you can see a doctor, you walk up to a counter in a room that sounds like this The person at the desk asks you a bunch of questions, like who's paying your bill, where you come from, your date of birth.

Touro Infirmary has been collecting this same information for over 150 years. 

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with historian Blain Roberts, co-author, with her husband Ethan Kytle, of “Denmark Vesey’s Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy.” Who owns history in Charleston, SC? Roberts talks bout historical quandaries in memorialization and the whitewashing of slavery --in  landmarks, monuments, museums, tours for tourists.  And there's a surprising detour into musical territory as well.

Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week:

Travis Lux / WWNO

When the Mississippi River flooded this spring, tons of water gushed through the Bonnet Carré Spillway, and into Lake Pontchartrain. The spillway is a big swath of open land, and it relieves the swollen river.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a tripod Xtra produced by Laine Kaplan-Levenson. In this tripod xtra, we hear an abridged talk given by Dr. Erin Greenwald, curator of the Historic New Orleans Collection's 'The Founding Era' exhibit. Greenwald traces New Orleans' African roots -- from their kidnapping in Africa, through the middle passage, to the seminal role Africans played in the founding of our city.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with another edition of TriPod Xtras. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Dartmouth history professor Rashauna Johnson have talked before for the show. This time, their conversation was taped live during the 2017 Organization of American Historians conference that took place earlier this year. The two discussed Johnson’s first book, Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions, which won the 2016 Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history.

Sandra Green Thomas

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history, and an attempt at reconciliation. Listen to Part I here

We left off at the Sold South Panel that took place in New Orleans in December of 2016. The discussion centered around something Georgetown University did in 1838 when the institution sold 272 enslaved people to two plantations in Louisiana to avoid bankruptcy.

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