Tulane University

Black Students Say Tulane Needs A Culture Change

Dec 9, 2019
Members of Les Griots Violets (from left to right) Raven Ancar, Deja Wells, Lexi Frame, Kamiya Stewart, Paige Magee, Abi Mbaye and Tabita Gnagniko.
Travis Lux / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Like many colleges and universities nationwide, Tulane University has a troubled past when it comes to race. The school’s namesake, Paul Tulane, was a wealthy New Orleans merchant whose fortune likely had ties to slavery. When he endowed the school in 1881, it was explicitly for the education of “young white persons." After a court battle, Tulane admitted its first black students in 1963. Now, more than 50 years later, some say the university still has a long way to go to make its campus truly welcoming to black students.

A group of black women students is organizing for both cultural and policy changes to make that happen.

A professor at Tulane University School of Medicine says top male physicians created a hostile work environment.
wikimedia commons

Top male professors at Tulane University School of Medicine created a "long-standing hostile and discriminatory work environment" for the women physicians, researchers and staff  who worked there, according to a complaint filed in federal court by Tulane medical school professor and physician Dr. Lesley Saketkoo.

This week on Thinking Outside the Book: Conservation librarian Sabrena Johnson and conservation specialist Sara White take us into the lab at the Tulane University libraries off-site storage facility and talk about their work.

This week: Producer George Ingmire and I begin a new series, Thinking Outside the Book, about the unusual uses and pleasures of books in readers' lives. First up: A visit with Eli Boyne, library associate at Tulane University's Howard-Tilton Rare Book Department, who shows us a Noble Fragment of a Gutenberg Bible.

Public Health Film Festival Debuts At Tulane

May 3, 2019
Public Health Film Festival

Tulane’s School of Public Health is hosting its first ever film festival, from May 10th through the 12th. The festival lineup covers a variety of public health-related topics that are relevant to our area, including water issues, gun violence, and veterans’ health. NolaVie’s David Benedetto invited organizer David Roston into the studio for a preview.

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by David Benedetto.

Tulane University Hosts 2nd Annual Indigenous Symposium

Apr 2, 2019
The New Orleans Center for the Gulf South

Tulane University and the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South are hosting the 2nd annual Indigenous Symposium. The symposium centers on indigenous perspectives that challenge colonial narratives, past and present. WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with symposium co-chair Dr. Laura Kelly, to learn more about the event. 

Orleans Parish officials say this is the fourth year of stagnant or declining test scores.
DCJOHN / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

A new study from Tulane University’s Education Research Alliance looks into how charter school reforms impacted New Orleans' expulsion and suspension rates. Researchers found that the reforms increased expulsion rates in the first few years after the state took over the city's schools, but that after mounting public pressure and a lawsuit, expulsion rates dropped back down.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Much of greater New Orleans has been naturally sinking for generations. But scientists don’t know a lot about why, where, or how fast it’s happening. So now, they’re looking below the streets for clues -- at the layers of dirt, sand, and mud. The city hopes it’ll help us prepare for the future.

Travis Lux / WWNO

According to Louisiana folklore, the Rougarou is a warewolf-like character that prowls the swamps and bayous at night -- threatening to bite you if you don’t observe lent.

Painter Jonathan Mayers heard a few Rougarou stories as a kid in Baton Rouge, but wishes he’d heard more. Now, he makes up his own -- with a paintbrush -- and an environmental twist.

Tulane Makes Learning About Race An Undergraduate Requirement
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

College campuses are more diverse than ever. But many students of color who attend historically white colleges and universities say their schools have a lot of catching up to do to make them feel welcome. Not just on campus, but in the curriculum. Tulane University has become one of the first historically white major research institutions to make learning about race a requirement.  

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