united houma nation

Bart Everson

This is the final episode of Tripod. For these past three years, we’ve been telling stories about New Orleans. But, before it was ever called New Orleans, this place already had a name: Bulbancha. The people that host Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with for this episode use this name when they tell people where they live. They live in Bulbancha, and they are telling today’s story -- what it’s like living in present day Bulbancha, and what it’s been like, as a native person, seeing the city celebrate the Tricentennial… the city’s colonial beginning.

From right, United Houma Nation first lady Noreen Dardar and principle chief Thomas Dardar with other members of the Gulf South Rising delegation from Louisiana. Dardar is in Paris seeking support for his coastal Louisiana tribe.
Monique Verdin / http://moniquemverdin.com

International leaders continue negotiations Monday at the climate talks in Paris, and some Louisianans are there to advocate for their communities. One of those is principle chief of the United Houma Nation, Thomas Dardar.

The Houma have long inhabited south Louisiana but are not federally recognized as a Native American tribe, partly because the government requires that tribes have a central base, but the Houma population is very spread out.

Michael Darda and Hali Dardar agree that when the land of southern Louisiana begins to erode into the Gulf, the Houma people will have to move, but that doesn't mean they have to let go of their culture.
StoryCorps

StoryCorps collects the voices of our time. Recently, Hali and Michael Dardar interviewed each other, but don’t be fooled by their common name — they’re not related. Before coming to StoryCorps, they’d only exchanged emails and phone calls about the Houma Language Project, an oral history project for the Houma Native American community.

United Houma Nation Gets Support For Federal Recognition

Jul 22, 2014
Jonathan McIntosh / Rainforest Action Network / Flickr

The Terrebonne Parish Council has passed a resolution in support of the United Houma Nation receiving federal recognition.

The Courier reports the council also asked the administrations of the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw and the Pointe-au-Chien tribes to submit necessary documents to receive similar council measures of support.

Potential policy shifts in the federal Department of the Interior may open the door for area Native American tribes to achieve federal recognition.