Tegan Wendland

Interim News Director, Lead Coastal Reporter

As interim news director Tegan has overseen the work of reporters and announcers, and has coordinated with counterparts at WRKF in Baton Rouge and other collaborating news organizations.

Tegan came to WWNO in 2015 to report coastal news. In this role she has covered a wide range of issues and subjects related to coastal land loss, coastal restoration, and the culture and economy of Louisiana’s coastal zone. Prominent recent projects include New Orleans: Ready Or Not?, a five-part series examining the city’s readiness for a future dominated by a changing climate, and Flyover: Down the Mississippi, a special production of Minnesota Public Radio in which she served as lead local producer for episodes focused on coastal land loss and the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

In 2017, Tegan was one of ten reporters from around the world to receive a Metcalf Fellowship for Marine and Environmental reporting, and she also received a competitive resilience reporting fellowship at CUNY in New York City. In 2016 she was named the Louisiana Wildlife Federation’s Conservation Communicator of the Year, and she secured funding to travel to Paris to report on the international climate talks there in 2015.

Tegan has a master’s degree in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has previously worked for NPR stations in the Midwest and WRKF in Baton Rouge.

Ways to Connect

Brett Duke, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

In this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talks with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune reporter Tristan Baurick about a controversial plan to build an airport inside Elmer's Island Wildlife Refuge. After undergoing a multimillion-dollar restoration, the south Jefferson Parish refuge teems with birds and other wildlife, including several threatened species. It came as a shock to many conservationists that the state had signed off on an idea to put an airport on protected habitat. 

Brett Duke / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

The Jefferson Parish landfill, and whether it's the source of persistent odors irritating Harahan and River Ridge residents, are the topics of this week's Coastal News Roundup. WWNO's Tegan Wendland talks with reporter Drew Broach of NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune. 

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Scores of coastal research labs around the U.S. are helping communities plan for sea level rise. But now many are starting to flood themselves, creating a dilemma: stay by the coast and endure expensive flooding, or move inland, to higher ground, but away from their subject of study.

The Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium lab is located along the state's fragile coast, about 80 miles southwest of New Orleans. The giant X-shaped building is at the end of a gravel road, surrounded by open water and grassy marshes.

Coastal News Roundup: Katrina Anniversary

Aug 31, 2018
NASA

This week marks the 13th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune environment reporter Mark Schleifstein about how that storm has affected the area's perception of risk, the levee system and the nation's hurricane forecasting.

Tristan Baurick, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

For this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talks with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune reporter Tristan Baurick about a possible shrimpers' strike and a visit to Port Eads, a little-known and remote outpost at the mouth of the Mississippi.

 

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Climate change is bringing more extreme temperatures —- the last decade was the warmest on record. Scientists say that pattern will continue.

In Louisiana, temperatures could increase by 10 degrees by the end of the century. Heat stresses human health and the electric grid. How prepared is New Orleans for the heat?

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Orleans is vulnerable. Even a small storm can wipe out power for thousands of homes. Scientists say climate change is going to bring more intense storms, heavier rainfall and increased heat. More than a decade after Hurricane Katrina, officials say the city is more protected than ever. But big storms are just one threat. This week, WWNO explores how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring with a special Coastal Desk series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / nola.com/The Times-Picayune

For this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with science fellow at nola.com/Times Picayune, Joan Meiners, about sea lice, migrating tropical diseases and bugs.

NOAA / noaa.gov

June first is the official start of hurricane season. It got started early with subtropical storm Alberto last weekend — forecasters say it’s likely to be an active or above-average season.

Army Corps of Engineers

Ahead of the official start of hurricane season nola.com/The Times-Picayune has released a series on the hurricane protection system built around the city. WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with reporter Mark Schleifstein about what he found.

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