COASTAL DESK

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

Coastal News Roundup: Burning The Marsh To Strengthen The Coast

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: marshes are usually pretty wet, so you might not think they'd burn -- but near Avery Island, land managers are lighting them on fire . Plus, we discuss conflict of interest accusations around one of the state’s big coastal restoration projects. WWNO’s Travis Lux talks about the week in coastal news with environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune.

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LOUISIANA EATS!

Chef Carl Cushenberry at the Roosevelt Hotel
Reggie Morris / Louisiana Eats

Louisiana Eats: Serving Up Great Restaurants With A Slice Of History

When it comes to historic restaurants, there’s no place like home – if you’re lucky enough to call New Orleans home! On this week's show, we time travel through the storied past of iconic French Quarter landmark, the Napoleon House . Chef Chris Montero gives us a tour of the historic property, from the bar to the cupola and all points in between. As it turns out, in addition to being an accomplished chef, Chris is also a passionate preservationist and historian. He shares two centuries worth of Girod and Impastato family lore and talks about the future of the establishment.

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How To Make Sure Your Math Anxiety Doesn't Make Your Kids Hate Math

A spike in blood pressure. A racing heart rate. Sweaty palms. For many adults, this is what they feel when faced with difficult math. But for kids, math anxiety isn't just a feeling, it can affect their ability to do well in school. This fear tends to creep up on students when performance matters the most, like during exams or while speaking in class. One reason for a kid's math anxiety? How their parents feel about the subject. "A parent might say, 'oh I'm not a math person, it's okay if you...

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Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show Harry Shearer brings us the second part of his 2018 Year in Rebuke. We’ll look back at the year that was with The Appresidentice, The Law Firm of Cohen & Cohen, Karzai Talk, Keeping Up With the Murdocks, an apology from Facebook, recordings from Omarosa Manigault’s stint at The White House, a new edition of The Apologies of the Week and original music by Harry.

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with New Orleans Museum of Art curator Vanessa Schmid, about the new catalogue, “The Orleans Collection,” accompanying the exhibit currently on view at NOMA until January 27. We’ll also hear from Sally Asher about her very charming book, “The Mermaids of New Orleans.”

This week, Continuum presents a program of medieval Christmas music, most of which is unknown to modern day listeners. Beginning with Aquitanian selections of the 12th century, the program progresses through the Italian, Spanish and German repertoire, ending with a selection of 15th century English carols. The music is performed by three outstanding American early music ensembles.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: marshes are usually pretty wet, so you might not think they'd burn -- but near Avery Island, land managers are lighting them on fire. Plus, we discuss conflict of interest accusations around one of the state’s big coastal restoration projects.

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks about the week in coastal news with environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune.

Chef Carl Cushenberry at the Roosevelt Hotel
Reggie Morris / Louisiana Eats

When it comes to historic restaurants, there’s no place like home – if you’re lucky enough to call New Orleans home! On this week's show, we time travel through the storied past of iconic French Quarter landmark, the Napoleon House. Chef Chris Montero gives us a tour of the historic property, from the bar to the cupola and all points in between. As it turns out, in addition to being an accomplished chef, Chris is also a passionate preservationist and historian. He shares two centuries worth of Girod and Impastato family lore and talks about the future of the establishment.

Brandon Robert

New Orleans has a way of making any holiday its own, so it’s no surprise that our Christmas season has a singular kind of sparkle. NolaVie’s Renée Peck illuminates Christmas in the Crescent City in this special holiday edition of Notes from New Orleans. 

American Routes Shortcuts: Eric Andersen

Dec 14, 2018
Eric Andersen
American Routes

Songwriter Eric Andersen developed his literary chops hanging out in San Francisco with Beat poets, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Allen Ginsberg. He moved to Greenwich Village during the early ‘60s folk revival, and wrote songs that Bob Dylan, Judy Collins, and Johnny Cash would cover. Andersen appeared in an Andy Warhol film with Edie Sedgwick and befriended Patti Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe while living in the Chelsea Hotel. He crossed Canada by train in concert with the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin and the Band, and recorded with friends Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, and Townes Van Zandt. But before all that counter-cultural glory, Eric grew up middle class in Pittsburgh, aiming for a conventional career.

Old cookbooks filled with recipes and stories fill a table at the Kitchen Witch store in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

When it comes to Christmas gift giving, a cookbook is often an easy call. The subjects are palatable, and usually noncontroversial. Getting a cookbook, or even giving one, at least conjures the fantasy of having enough time to actually use it.

But how to pick one from the blizzard of releases that fill the stores? My own answer, evolved over time, is to start by looking in my own kitchen cabinet.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Several green infrastructure projects will be coming to New Orleans' most flood-prone neighborhoods thanks to an $86-thousand grant from the Institute for Sustainable Communities.

Healthy Community Services, a local nonprofit, will use the grant money to build green infrastructure projects designed to collect stormwater - like rain gardens - in the 7th Ward and Treme, two areas that flooded heavily last year.

Illustration by Jasper Means

In 1979, Ernest "Dutch" Morial became the first black mayor of New Orleans. He won the election with 95% of the black vote, and just 20% of the white vote. He campaigned on a platform of police reform, but it wasn’t just Dutch who wanted to re-organize the NOPD – they were organizing themselves. They wanted a union, pay increases, and better working conditions. Soon after Dutch took office, the police wasted no time. They staged their first strike, in history. Their bargaining tool? Mardi Gras.

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A Special Holiday Partnership

LE SHOW

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

Le Show For The Week Of December 16, 2018

This week on Le Show Harry Shearer brings us the second part of his 2018 Year in Rebuke. We’ll look back at the year that was with The Appresidentice , The Law Firm of Cohen & Cohen , Karzai Talk , Keeping Up With the Murdocks, an apology from Facebook, recordings from Omarosa Manigault’s stint at The White House, a new edition of The Apologies of the Week and original music by Harry.

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THE READING LIFE

The Reading Life with Winston Groom and James Nolan

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with novelist and historian Winston Groom, whose new book is “The Allies, Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin and the Unlikely Alliance That Won World War II.” We’ll hear about U.S. poet laureate Tracy K. Smith’s visit to Louisiana this week, as well as some poetry from James Nolan, whose new book is “Nasty Water: Collected New Orleans Poems.”

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Sticky Wicket is a new mini series out of WWNO and WRKF that takes on four historic clashes between Louisiana politicians and the media, one at a time.

FOOD & DINING

Old cookbooks filled with recipes and stories fill a table at the Kitchen Witch store in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Where Y’Eat: In Old Cookbooks, a Recipe for Memorable Gifts

When it comes to Christmas gift giving, a cookbook is often an easy call. The subjects are palatable, and usually noncontroversial. Getting a cookbook, or even giving one, at least conjures the fantasy of having enough time to actually use it.

But how to pick one from the blizzard of releases that fill the stores? My own answer, evolved over time, is to start by looking in my own kitchen cabinet.

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Susan Larson, host of The Reading Life, talks with local authors and readers about their favorite books from three hundred years of New Orleans literature.