COASTAL DESK

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

Coastal News Roundup: Major Report Says Future Grim, But Climate Target Technically Possible

The goal of the 2016 Paris Climate agreement is to limit global warming to less than two degrees celsius above pre-industrial levels. While President Trump has announced his intentions to pull out of the agreement, other nations, cities, and researchers are still working toward that goal. This week, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report showing what will happen if the earth warms more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels (we’re already at about 1°C). The outlook is dire. For this week’s coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with one of the report’s authors, Bill Solecki, professor of Geography at Hunter College in New York.

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THE READING LIFE

The Reading Life with Kiese Laymon

This week on The Reading Life: Kiese Laymon, author of “Heavy: An American Memoir.” Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week: Le Petit Theatre is partnering with Octavia Books for a Book Club, to be hosted by Christina Pellegrini and including special guests from each production. The first meeting is Sunday, October 14, at 1 p.m. at Le Petit Theatre; the book for discussion is “Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong," by Terry Teachout. Poet Melinda Palacio reads from “Bird Forgiveness,”...

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Michael Will Cost Insurers Billions, But Won't Overwhelm Industry, Analysts Say

Analysts are estimating that Hurricane Michael has caused billions of dollars of damage and will create a substantial loss for insurers, but the industry is expected to cope — once again avoiding the kind of meltdown that Florida saw in the 1990s, after Hurricane Andrew. It's still too early for a full accounting of the financial fallout. And insurance adjusters — like residents, utilities and rescue teams — have grappled with blocked roads and downed communication systems as they try to...

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This week on The Reading Life:  Kiese Laymon, author of “Heavy: An American Memoir.”

Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week:

Le Petit Theatre is partnering with Octavia Books for a Book Club, to be hosted by Christina Pellegrini and including special guests from each production. The first meeting is Sunday, October 14, at 1 p.m. at Le Petit Theatre; the book for discussion is “Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong," by Terry Teachout.

Poet Melinda Palacio reads from “Bird Forgiveness,” Sunday, October 14, at 3 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar.

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer gets a phone call from Donald, Brett Kavanaugh sings  "I Don't Remember Christmas," News of Microplastics, We're Not #1, News of Smart Houses,  This Is Your Brain on the War on Drugs, News of the Godly, The Apologies of the Week, and more!

Continuum presents a highly spirited program of joyful songs and dances featuring cheerful sounds and ringing melodies of the late-medieval period. Bombards, shawms, lutes, harps and gitterns provide a rich program of music, with songs and instrumental music from Spain, Italy, France and Britain. Performances are by a wide variety of very talented instrumentalists with the assistance of The Oxford Girls' Choir. Recording used is: Marking Merrye (Various instrumentalists and The Oxford Girls' Choir) -The Gift of Music CCL CDG 1062.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

The goal of the 2016 Paris Climate agreement is to limit global warming to less than two degrees celsius above pre-industrial levels. While President Trump has announced his intentions to pull out of the agreement, other nations, cities, and researchers are still working toward that goal.

This week, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report showing what will happen if the earth warms more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels (we’re already at about 1°C). The outlook is dire.

For this week’s coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with one of the report’s authors, Bill Solecki, professor of Geography at Hunter College in New York.

Sixteen-year-old Akelah Sherman (center) and her fellow dancers warm up before rehearsing for their performance.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

For many, the teenage years are a time when you start to realize the world isn’t fair, and life can be tough. Facing issues like income inequality, racism, and violence, can be overwhelming. One unique program in New Orleans is helping students engage with tough social issues through dance.

New Orleans Film Society

October 17th marks the beginning of the 29th annual New Orleans Film Festival, which brings feature films and shorts to venues across the city. NolaVie’s David Benedetto invited the Film Society’s Executive Director, Fallon Young, into the studio for a preview of the festival.

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by David Benedetto.

American Routes Shortcuts: Remembering Johnny Cash

Oct 12, 2018
Johnny Cash
American Routes

Johnny Cash was born in the tiny town of Kingsland, Arkansas in 1932. By the age of four, his parents Ray and Carrie Cash had moved the family to Dyess, Arkansas, not far from Memphis, along the Mississippi River. Dyess was built as a government resettlement program for troubled farmers during the depression. The Cash’s and three hundred other families worked the land, picking cotton. Johnny’s younger sister Joanne Cash Yates remembers early life in Dyess.

Ian McNulty

With fall in the air, the New Orleans tourism season is revving up after its long summer lull. It’s the happy time for the hospitality sector here.

It's also a good time to acknowledge that while the tourists bring their wallets, they also carry double-edged swords. Simply put: the more New Orleans restaurants rely on them, the less these restaurants need New Orleans people.

Historic New Orleans Collection

 Tripod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a look at the Desire community, then and now.

If you've from New Orleans, or you’ve lived here for a minute, you know how often locals identify themselves by their neighborhood. Before Katrina, for thousands of New Orleans residents, these neighborhoods were public housing developments: the Magnolia, B.W. Cooper, C.J. Peete, the Calliope. All those developments are now gone, they’ve all been demolished, and so they’re not part of what’s been this ongoing citywide Tricentennial conversation. But these communities remain super important parts of thousands of people’s lives, and this city's history. So, for one of our final Tripod episodes we decided to hear from residents of the one of those neighborhoods: The Desire.

Rickie Lee Jones says she moved to New Orleans, in part, because she wanted to be around people. In Los Angeles, she was mostly around cars.

So far, so good. People from New Orleans — either real or imagined — are all over her latest effort, “The Other Side of Desire.” And one of Jones’ neighbors here even helped inspire a song on the album. 

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LE SHOW

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

Le Show For the Week of Oct. 14, 2018

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer gets a phone call from Donald, Brett Kavanaugh sings "I Don't Remember Christmas," News of Microplastics , We're Not #1 , News of Smart Houses, This Is Your Brain on the War on Drugs , News of the Godly , The Apologies of the Week , and more!

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THE READING LIFE

The Reading Life with Ken Foster and Alison Pelegrin

This week on The Reading Life: Ken Foster talks about “City of Dogs: New York Dogs, Their Neighborhoods, and The People Who Love Them.” It's a great way to look at a city! Poet Alison Pelegrin reads from and discusses her most recent chapbook, “Our Lady of the Flood.” Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week: Poet Paul Benton reads from and signs “Luckland,” Sunday, October 7, at 3:30 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar. Dacre Stoker, great grandson of Bram Stoker, and his coauthor J. D....

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How prepared is New Orleans for the challenges that climate change will bring in coming years? WWNO and The Lens explore this question with a special series.

Classical 104.9 FM

New Orleans’ source for 24-hour classical music.

TRIPOD: NEW ORLEANS AT 300

*TriPod: New Orleans at 300* is WWNO’s FRESH radio history of New Orleans, released in weekly segments as our city approaches its Tricentennial in 2018.

TRICENTENNIAL READING LIST

Susan Larson, host of The Reading Life, talks with local authors and readers about their favorite books from three hundred years of New Orleans literature.

FOOD & DINING

Ian McNulty

Where Y’Eat, Oct. 11, 2018: As New Orleans Dining Expands, Keeping New Orleans in the Equation

With fall in the air, the New Orleans tourism season is revving up after its long summer lull. It’s the happy time for the hospitality sector here. It's also a good time to acknowledge that while the tourists bring their wallets, they also carry double-edged swords. Simply put: the more New Orleans restaurants rely on them, the less these restaurants need New Orleans people.

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